FR: il y a toujours des gens pour rire de / des gens qui rient de

acdeecee

New Member
English - UK
Bonjour,

I have to fill in the blank in the following phrase for a practice test:

Il y a toujours des gens ______ rire des malheurs des autres.

Options for the blank are: de, à, pour, par, (nothing). Cannot figure it out!

Any help appreciated!
Merci :)
 
  • acdeecee

    New Member
    English - UK
    None of the results make much sense to me, is the problem! I would presume it's de or à, but I truly don't know what function either has in this context. Why would it not just be "des gens qui rient"?
     

    Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    As a matter of fact, neither de nor à works here. You actually need pour, which goes with il y a to make a set phrase. The sentence means more or less the same as your suggestion with the relative clause (qui rient), but there is a small nuance:

    Il y a toujours des gens pour rire du malheur des autres. = You can always find people laughing at the misfortune of others.
    Il y a toujours des gens qui rient du malheur des autres. = There are always people laughing at the misfortune of others.
     
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