FR: Je fais du X / Je ne fais pas de X

La Mademoiselle

Member
English
Take, for example this sentence:

Je fais du karaté.

If you were to make it negative, would it be:

Je ne fais pas de karaté. ?

Likewise, in the perfect past tense, the conditional past and the subjunctive past, would 'de' instead of 'du' still be used?
Would this rule be applied every time a sentence (with a noun as the object of the sentence) is made negative?

Merci en avance!
 
  • Mr Swann

    Senior Member
    French - France
    je ne faisais pas de karaté en1999
    je n'avais pas fait de karaté avant de monter à Roanne ( 42)
    je ne ferai jamais de karaté, ce n'est pas mon truc
    Maman voudrait que je ne fasse pas de karaté
    Elle eût (aurait) voulu que je ne fisse pas de karaté
    Avec ses horaires impossible , d'ici Juin, il n'aura pas fait de karaté cette année.

    voili voilà


    Ps on dit
    D'avance merci
    ou
    Merci d'avance

    mais rarement merci en avance
     
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    La Mademoiselle

    Member
    English
    Thank you for all the help - I'd just like to clarify whether 'de' is always used instead of 'du' and 'de la' when a sentence is made negative, regardless of which tense the sentence is in?

    Alors, merci d'avance.
     

    jann

    co-mod'
    English - USA
    I'd just like to clarify whether 'de' is always used instead of 'du' and 'de la' when a sentence is made negative, regardless of which tense the sentence is in?
    Correct. :) Regardless of tense, the partitive articles (du, de la, de l') and actually also the indefinite articles (un, une, des) become de in the negative.

    The exception is when you are identifying something with the verb être... or if you want to insist that you don't have "a single one," or to correct that it's not about "one" of something but rather "two" or "three" or however many.

    See here (part 4 of the article) for the general rule, and here for more discussion about the exceptions.
     
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