FR: la mariée s'est preparée à recevoir le saint sacrement

s0949457

Member
Scottish
Hi guys!

With this sentence:
"la mariée s'est preparée à recevoir le saint sacrement" - I thought that if there was a direct object in the sentence that came after the verb it did not agree, but if there was a direct object before the verb, it agrees with that and in all other cases it agrees with the subject. Does preparer agree with la mariée because a direct object "le saint sacrement" comes after the verb? Or does the a recevoir constitute an indirect object? How are indirect objects treated with reference to agreement with pronominal verbs?

Thanks
 
  • juliatopaz

    Senior Member
    English- American
    "preparée" agrees with "la mariée" because it's a reflexive verb and the past participles of reflexive verbs agree with their subject in the past.

    As far as indirect/direct object agreement goes, agreement doesn't occur when there's just a direct or indirect object, but when there's a direct or indirect object pronoun. I was under the impression that it was the other way around, past participles with direct object pronouns agree and those with indirect object pronouns do not.
    Though you might want to get the opinion of a French person.
     

    jann

    co-mod'
    English - USA
    I thought that if there was a direct object in the sentence that came after the verb it the past participle of the reflexive verb did not agree, but if there was a direct object before the verb, it the past participle agrees with that preceding direct object and in all other cases it the past participle of the reflexive verb agrees with the subject.
    You thought right....
    Does preparer agree with la mariée because a direct object "le saint sacrement" comes after the verb? Or does the a recevoir constitute an indirect object?
    ... but you have incorrectly identified the grammatical relationship between the various words in the sentence. :)

    What gets received? The sacrament. --> Le saint sacrement is the direct object of recevoir.

    The sacrament is not related to the verb se préparer, and it is certainly not the direct object of se préparer. If it were, that would be like saying "she gets ready the sacrament." :eek:

    What gets readied or prepared? She does! She prepares herself to receive the sacrament. So she is the direct object of the verb se préparer. In fact, the reflexive pronoun itself represents the direct object. And that se is feminine, just like the subject elle. So regardless of whether you use the rule that the past participle should agree with the subject (elle) or the preceding direct object (se), you will arrive at the correct agreement: elle s'est préparée

    And what, exactly, is that à recevoir ? It's a verbal complement: what she got ready to do. Even if you didn't know that à recevoir was a verbal complement, you could be sure that recevoir wasn't a direct object because it is introduced by a preposition (à)!

    I wrote a general explanation of pronominal agreement in reply to a question on these forums a long time ago. This post (which I also mentioned in your other thread) may help you.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top