FR: lui fait perdre

PotatoTomato

New Member
Mandarin - China
Bonjour tout le monde!

I have a question regarding the preposition in the construction "Fair + l'infinitif". The following sentence comes from a Canadian government page:

"...Désigne la déformation d'une membrure qui lui fait perdre une partie de ses propriétés de raidissement"

I am not sure why the preposition before "fait perdre" is lui and not the direct object pronoun le. For me, this part seems to mean "....which causes it to lose", so I don't understand where the preposition comes in. Can someone explain why this is the case?

Merci!
 
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  • Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    The pronoun is lui because the form is "faire perdre X à Y", and lui stands for the indirect object (à Y).

    In your sentence, lui stands for implicit "à la membrure". The sentence can be written:
    La déformation d'une membrure (subject) fait perdre (verb) une partie de ses propriétés de raidissement (direct object: what is lost) à la membrure (indirect object: what is losing).
     
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    PotatoTomato

    New Member
    Mandarin - China
    Thank you for your responses! I understand that there isn't a preposition, but it seemed weird that an indirect pronoun is used. To me, "fait perdre à la membrure" means "making something lose to the frame", not "making the frame lose something".
     

    jekoh

    Senior Member
    Fr - Fr
    It's fairly common for a French verb to take an indirect object when the corresponding English verb takes a direct object, and vice versa.

    écouter quelqu'un = to listen to someone
    obéir à quelqu'un = to obey someone
     
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