FR: no longer thyme nor marjoram

Casquilho

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hello! Can you please help me with this phrase of Montaigne (essai "De l'Institution des Enfans"); there he compares the work to be produced by reading and studying to that of bees, collecting nectar from many flowers, but producing a honey that is totally theirs, and no longer thyme nor marjoram - ce [miel] n'est plus thin ny marjolaine, or in modern French, ce n'est plus thym ni marjolaine.

It's in fact a simple question: how can I say, in an epigrammatic way, "no longer thyme nor marjoram", in a grammatically correct French, changing Montaigne's original phrase as little as possible. I thought of non plus thym ni marjolaine, but I'm in serious doubt about that, since my knowledge of French is virtually zero.

Merci!
 
  • Casquilho

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    But if using "n'est plus", the verb would imply a subject [miel] and I'd like to construct a motto that could grammatically stand by itself, detached from context (the meaning of "no longer thyme nor marjoram" wouldn't be clear for someone unfamiliar with the original, but that's ok, in fact it's intentional). That's why I thought of non plus.
     
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