FR: omitting the subject pronoun

stevewatson1972

Member
English - England
Bonjour!

This is just a general grammar question, so apologies if this gets posted in the wrong place!

I was just wondering if the subject pronoun ever gets dropped in informal French in the same way it does in English?

Example: "What did you do on holiday?"
"Went walking. Visited the colliseum. Ate lots of nice food."

(rather than "WE went walking. WE visited the colliseum. WE ate lots of nice food")

Does this ever happen in French, or is the subject pronoun essential?

Merci bien!

Steve
 
  • in colloquial french, i guess it is more common to shorten the pronoun+have/be part. for instance:

    "jsuis allé au musée"

    often found orally amoung young populations and in texting/chatting contexts.

    you would hardly hear "suis allé au musée". maybe written...

    hope this helps! ;)

    edit: in formal french as said in the previous posts, it is unpolite indeed
     

    Llewella

    Member
    French - France
    You can find it written in a specific context, such as text messages, just to make it shorter. As Micia93 said, it would sound impolite.

    But "jsuis allé au musée" sounds very French!
     

    bevare

    New Member
    Polish
    Il est essentiel de les utiliser parce que nous ne sauriez pas de qui on parle.
    Si vous dites:
    "Pars en vacances", qu'est-ce que vous entendez?
    Cela pourrait signifier alors "je pars" "tu pars" "il part" etc.
     

    francophonophil

    Member
    British English
    In the following sentence, has the 'vous' subject been omitted before vous dites?

    "Vous annoncez un résultat incroyable et vous dites sûr de vous."
    [You announce an incredible result and claim you are sure (of it/yourself)]

    If the verb here is the reflexive se dire (as in se prétendre / to claim to be...__), shouldn't the sentence be, instead, 'Vous annoncez un résultat incroyable, et vous vous dites sûr de vous."?

    Otherwise, I'm guessing this is elision of the subject pronoun (which is common in English, e.g. in the above sentence, there's no problem with 'and claim' rather than 'and you claim').

    Can you, in fact, omit the subject (pronoun) in French in certain cases? -- if you are using a series of verbs punctuated by 'and', for example?
    (J'ai mangé au resto-u et pris un café avec mes potes) (intended meaning='et j'ai pris')
     

    Oddmania

    Senior Member
    French
    Can you, in fact, omit the subject (pronoun) in French in certain cases? -- if you are using a series of verbs punctuated by 'and', for example?
    (J'ai mangé au resto-u et pris un café avec mes potes) (intended meaning='et j'ai pris')
    Sure, it's fine :thumbsup:
    In the following sentence, has the 'vous' subject been omitted before vous dites?

    "Vous annoncez un résultat incroyable et vous dites sûr de vous."
    Yes, it was omitted. I don't recommend dropping the pronouns nous or vous when using a reflexive verb, though. I had to read the sentence twice to get it right, because my first thought upon reading it was "you say", not "you claim".
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    Yes, it was omitted. I don't recommend dropping the pronouns nous or vous when using a reflexive verb, though. I had to read the sentence twice to get it right, because my first thought upon reading it was "you say", not "you claim".
    I had the same reaction. As if he had meant to write : et vous dites que vous êtes sûr.

    But I don't like the sound of « vous vous dîtes sûr de vous ». Too many vous.
    There, I would say : ... et prétendez être sûr de vous.

    If the original was Il, the sense would be clear whether or not you omit (il) : Il annonce un résultat incroyable et (il) se dit sûr de lui.

    Note : I added something to thread that Maitre Capello indicated above. ;)
     
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