FR: réussir (à) un examen, des études - pronom y / le, les

Discussion in 'French and English Grammar / Grammaire française et anglaise' started by poireau, Oct 27, 2007.

  1. poireau Senior Member

    English, USA
    Bonjour comment diriez-vous plus court.

    Je reussis a l'examen.

    "Je lui/le reussis"?

    Merci
     
  2. charleythefrog Senior Member

    Ireland French
    hello,

    I'd say "j'ai réussi l'examen" or shorter "je l'ai réussi" there, people must know what you're talking about.
     
  3. tilt

    tilt Senior Member

    Nord-Isère, France
    French French
    Je le réussis, definitely.
     
  4. Xavier11222 Senior Member

    Paris
    France French
    Would be J'y réussis, and it is, except that it's not used. So we say Je le réussis.
     
  5. charleythefrog Senior Member

    Ireland French
    there's something I don't understand... your not suppose to talk during an exam. Then you can say before "je vais (le) réussir" or after "je l'ai réussi"/"j'ai réussi".

    I've never heard the sentence "je le reussis" about an exam!
     
  6. Xavier11222 Senior Member

    Paris
    France French
    No, but have you never thought it?:)

    But seriously you can also take an exam that run over more than a day, and report - somewhat cockily - that you're acing it.
     
  7. tilt

    tilt Senior Member

    Nord-Isère, France
    French French
    Yes, je le réussi and j'y réussi are theoretically both correct because réussir l'examen and réussir à l'examen are both possible. But the former only is used, that's right.

    Some possibilities:
    - C'est décidé, aujourd'hui, je réussis cet examen !
    - Quand j'ai bien révisé, je réussis mon examen.
    - Si je réussis l'examen, je pars en vacances.
    :)
     
  8. Krakouvi New Member

    FRANCE
    je le réussis avec un ''s'' et non je le réussi.
    (réussir, 3 eme groupe)

    :)
     
  9. TheGiantKudu New Member

    English- England
    Hi everyone,

    Please can somebody tell me whether or not I am using 'y' correctly in the following sentence (and whether the sentence makes sense :))

    Je fais des études de droit. Si j’y réussis, je serai contente.

    I am trying to say: 'I am studying law. If I pass (the course), I will be pleased.

    Thanks
     
  10. timboleicester

    timboleicester Senior Member

    Paris
    English - UK
    To me it sounds better without the "y" in any case it would be "je les réussis" to match the "les études"

    it is "réussir à faire quelque chose" and "réussir quelque chose"
     
  11. Lacuzon

    Lacuzon Senior Member

    France
    French - France
    :tick: I agree.
     
  12. TheGiantKudu New Member

    English- England
    Hi again,

    I'm a little bit confused now. My dictionary states that

    'Il a réussi à l’examen'= 'He passed the exam'.

    In this sentence ‘l’examen’ is an indirect object. Is it not, therefore, appropriate to substitute ‘‘il y a reussi’?

    Thanks
     
  13. Lacuzon

    Lacuzon Senior Member

    France
    French - France
    Bonsoir,

    Il a réussi son examen -> Il l'a réussi.
    Il a réussi à son examen -> Il y a réussi.

    Réussir un examen is more common than réussir à un examen.
     
  14. TheGiantKudu New Member

    English- England
    Thank you for replying so quickly Lacuzon

    So, if were to say ‘Je suis un cours de français’ I could write either:

    Si j’y réussis, je serai contente.
    Si je le réussis, je serai contente.

    And the second option would be one which is more commonly used?

    Thanks
     
  15. Lacuzon

    Lacuzon Senior Member

    France
    French - France
    You've got it.
     
  16. timboleicester

    timboleicester Senior Member

    Paris
    English - UK
    I've just tried the "si j'y réussi" one of the ball and chain (from Grenoble) and you know what? She corrected me to the 2nd option....so be warned!
     
  17. Madame Dianne New Member

    North Carolina
    English
    "Y" is used to replace phrases introduced by "à", either written or implied. Example: Je suis au cours de sciences. J'y suis.
    "en" is used to replace phrases introduced by "de". Example: Je prends de la glace . J'en prends.
    The english translations vary according to the context of the sentence.
    A l'examen is not an indirect object......it is a prepositional phrase being used as the direct object in this sentence.
     
  18. Lacuzon

    Lacuzon Senior Member

    France
    French - France
    Bonjour,

    I disagree, in réussir à un examen, à un examen is indeed an indirect object. Nevertheless réussir un examen is so much more common that when using a pronoun we almost always use a direct one.
     
  19. Madame Dianne New Member

    North Carolina
    English
    Indirect objects tell "to whom, or for whom" something is done. Direct objects receive the action of the verb. When either is preceeded by a preposition, it then becomes a prepositional phrase. "A un examen" might be mistaken for a direct object; but in no way could it be an indirect object. In English, it is impossible to have an indirect obj. without a direct object. In French, it is possible.
     
  20. timboleicester

    timboleicester Senior Member

    Paris
    English - UK
    If "il réussit un examen" contains a direct object then surely it follows that " il réussit à un examen" contains an indirect one.....

    As for the assertion that English cannot have an indirect object without a direct one, well I find this hard to believe. "I sing to her everyday....." isn't "to her" an indirect object?
     
  21. Lacuzon

    Lacuzon Senior Member

    France
    French - France
    As far as I understand, what you call an indirect object in English is called un complément d'objet second (COS) in French
    I send a letter (direct object) to peter (indirect objet) -> J'envoie une lettre (COD=complément d'objet direct) à Pierre (COS)
    And what you call a prepositionnal sentence in English is called un complément d'objet indirect in French
    I wrote to Peter (prepositionnal sentence) -> J'écris à Pierre (COI=complément d'objet indirect)

    If that is then we are saying the same thing with different words.

    In addition some grammarians call a COI a COS.
     
  22. purpledragonunicorn Member

    English- United Kingdom
    Bonjour,
    I would like to know which pronoun I would need for "at them". I am attempting to say "I want to succeed at them" when referring to my exams, and I know that if there were only one exam, I could say "Je veux y réussir", but I have no clue how to pluralise this construction.
    Merci
     
  23. atcheque Senior Member

    français (France)
    Bonjour,

    Y could be plural. But I would use: les réussir (singular : le réussir).
     
  24. purpledragonunicorn Member

    English- United Kingdom
    Okay, thank-you very much!
     
  25. OLN

    OLN Senior Member

    France
    French - France, ♀
    […]
    réussir à un examen, réussir un examen, Cf. Grevisse :

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 4, 2017
  26. Maître Capello

    Maître Capello Mod et ratures

    Suisse romande
    French – Switzerland
    Il est certes possible de dire y réussir, mais c'est un tour rare à notre époque. De nous jours on dira les réussir comme suggéré plus haut.
     

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