FR: Singing is more interesting than swimming

tamitha

New Member
English
In my French class, I ran across the issue of gerunds, specifically, when I compare them. For example, comparing swimming to singing.
“Singing is more interesting than swimming."
How would this be written in French?
Would you use the normal form of the verb singing (chanter) and swimming (nager)? Like “Chanter est plus intéressante que nager”
I would assume not, and that they change forms, and I know how to do that if the verb was associated with a pronoun, but if it is stand-alone, like in this case, what would the appropriate form?
How am I supposed to alter these verbs?

Thank you,
Tamitha
 
  • Forero

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I would say "Le chanter est plus intérresant que le nager" or "Il est plus intérresant de chanter que de nager."

    French does not have gerunds, so the normal form (infinitive) is its only verbal noun.
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    I would say "Le chanter est plus intérresant que le nager" :cross:or "Il est plus intéressant de chanter que de nager.":tick:
    Hello,

    I'm sorry to say that your first suggestion doesn't work. :( Chanter and nager are verbs, so they cannot be preceded by an article.
    To use nouns, you'd have to say : La chanson est plus intéressante que la nage.


    Incidentally... welcome to the forum, tamitha. :)
     

    pointvirgule

    Senior Member
    langue française
    Would you use the normal form of the verb singing (chanter) and swimming (nager)? Like “Chanter est plus intéressant que nager”
    Oui, décidément.

    Edit - Sorry, brain cramp. What I meant to say is that one way to translate gerunds into French is to use infinitives.
     
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    Monsieur Hoole

    Senior Member
    Canada English
    First of all, why is it "La" as opposed to "Le"? Also, how do you know to use chanSON instead of chanter, and nage as opposed to nager?

    chanter and nager are verbs, so can't have articles.

    chanson and nage are nouns. all nouns in french are either masculine (le) or feminine (la).

    M. H. :)
     

    tamitha

    New Member
    English
    Okay, I think I understand. Would "Le chant est plus intéressant que la nager" be appropriate then?
    Also, would that mean "the singing is more interesting than the swimming"?
    Because if that is so, that is not what I was trying to get at. Is there a way to say simply singing and not THE singing? Like, "chant est plus intéressant que nager"? Or would I have to include the act of singing, like "L'acte de chant est plus intéressant que l'acte de nager"?
     

    Nicomon

    Senior Member
    Français, Québec ♀
    Okay, I think I understand. Would "Le chant est plus intéressant que la nage":tick: (no r) be appropriate then?
    Yes, chant is actually better than chanson. I should have thought of it. But this is if you want to replace verbs with nouns.
    Also, would that mean "the singing is more interesting than the swimming"?
    Because if that is so, that is not what I was trying to get at. Is there a way to say simply singing and not THE singing? Like, "chant est plus intéressant que nager"? Or would I have to include the act of singing, like "L'acte de chanter est plus intéressant que l'acte de nager"?[/quote
    Chant is a noun, whereas nager is a verb. So for balance, you need to make a choice.
    Either two nouns (chant/nage) - in which case you DO need the articles - or two verbs (chanter/nager). :)

    If by signing is more interesting than swimming, you mean to say : I prefer to sign than to swim then you may want to go with the verbs, in their infinitive form.

    So either : Chanter est plus intéressant que de nager OR (which would be my choice) Il est plus intéressant de chanter que de nager.

    By definition : Le chant = l'action de chanter / la nage = l'action de nager.

    I hope I didn't make it even more confusing. :eek:
     
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