FR: there - y / là / là-bas

< Previous | Next >

garavak

Senior Member
USA
Hello...
I think the proper way to say: I will be there is...Je serai là. Buy why not...J'y serai. When do you use "Y" instead of "là" when referring to "there"? I'm going there is : J'y vais. Why not Je vais là. Thanks for the help!!!!

Chuck

Moderator note: Multiple threads merged to create this one. Regarding the special case of aller in the future or conditional, see FR: I will/would go there - j'irai(s) là-bas - pronom "y" ?
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • DDT

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    "Je serai là/là-bas" (depending on context) can be replaced with "J'y serai", just a matter of style IMHO
    "J'y vais" can be replaced with "Je vais là-bas" since là-bas corresponds to "(over) there", to a place far from who's speaking (you cannot but "go" somewhere else ;) ); you cannot say "Je vais là" since "là" corresponds to "here"

    Hope it helps,

    DDT
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    marget

    Senior Member
    I think that j'y vais means I'm going ...there (to a place that has been previously mentioned or that is implied)), but how does correspond to here if one were to say "Je vais là"? I also feel that one cannot say "Je vais là", I just don't understand how là could mean here.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    FrançoisXV

    Senior Member
    Français, France
    Well... DDT is not perfectly right...
    I'll be there can translate both with "là or y" except in some cases, where one is better than the other.
    don't know if there is a rule, i guess that if you are lasting, preferred use of là, and if you are moving, preferred use of Y.
    (but both seems correct)

    -Demain, je compte sur ton aide.
    -ne t'inquiète pas, je serai là.

    -n'oublie pas, rendez-vous devant la gare à 7 heures et demie.
    -ne t'inquiète pas, j'y serai.

    I'm going there:
    -vas au marché (m'acheter des légumes.)
    -d'accord, j'y vais. (not je vais là)

    Showing something on a map: je vais là (not j'y vais) because là means here
    Here = ici, là and there = là-bas

    j'y vais pour faire quelquechose.
    je vais là pour faire quelquechose. (in fact, -bas is dropped)
    common use, but I don't know if it is perfect french.
     

    anangelaway

    Senior Member
    French
    Yes I agree, exactly as you said
    j'y vais pour faire quelquechose.
    je vais là pour faire quelquechose. (in fact, -bas is dropped

    And this is what DDT meant by là as là-bas.

    In Je vais là, là means here and not there, which 'there' here would be 'là-bas''.


     

    tainted1899

    Member
    English, Mandarin, Singapore
    Salut!

    Je ne suis pas très claire sur l'utilisation du pronom 'y'.

    In which situations should one use 'y' and 'là' to represent 'there'?

    For eg, if I were to say 'he was not there', is it 'il n'était pas là' or should it be 'il n'y était pas'?
    et aussi, would 'i have many friends there' be 'j'ai beaucoup d'amis là' or 'j'y ai beaucoup d'amis'?

    Merci encore pour l'aide!!
     

    Jul

    Member
    French, France
    Je pense que les 2 sont correctes.

    J apporterais cependant une precision pour ta 3eme traduction :
    j'ai beaucoup d'amis là bas. - over there

    […]
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    l'instant_X

    New Member
    English, United States
    Yes, sometimes I don't know when it is appropriate to use "la" for "there", or "y". What is the rule/guideline? For example, if someone asks, "etes-vous chez toi?", would I respond, "oui, je suis la" or "oui, j'y suis". This is just one example, as I am constantly confused about this. Is it a question of emphasis? Merci bien!
     

    heydzatsmi

    Senior Member
    Francais
    For me there are not a big difference.
    But we often say : "j'y suis" when we finally arrived (at this place) after some effort.
    And we often say "je suis là" when someone is searching you... "Où es tu?" Je suis là

    At this question "Es tu chez toi?"
    I think we would just answer : "Oui"
    or "Oui, je suis chez moi"

    If you have any questions, you can ask me.
     

    Fred_C

    Senior Member
    Français
    Hi.
    The difference is as follows :
    Y acts like a pronoun : You use it as you would use the word "it" if you do not want to repeat the last mentioned thing :
    So, if you are asking "es-tu chez toi", you would answer, "j'y suis", because y stands for "chez moi".
    On the other hand, "là" always refer to a place you are pointing (at least mentally) with your finger. Unlike in english, it cannot replace a previously mentionned place.
     

    hoborg

    New Member
    Poland / polish
    Salut, je lis ce site depuis longtemps mais j'ecrit pour la premiere fois :)

    Quelle est exactement la difference entre 'y' et 'là' ? Je sais qu'on peut dire :

    Je dois y aller en velo.

    Est-ce qu'on peut egalement dire:

    Je dois aller là en velo ? Je ne pense pas.

    Excusez-moi l'absence d'accents mais je n'ai pas de clavier francais.
     

    butterflyclouds

    Member
    Montreal, QC [French, English & Vietnamese]
    "y" est utilisé pour remplacer "là", dans ce contexte-ci. Prends par exemple la phrase "Je dois me rendre à cet endroit."

    Si ça a déjà été mentionné, dans une conversation, par exemple, on peut dire: "Je dois m'y rendre." et "y" remplacera "à cet endroit".

    J'espère avoir pu être assez claire. ^_^;
     

    pruna

    Member
    Oui, c'est la même chose, mai il es plus courant de dire je dois y aller à vélo.
    […]
    Y équivaut à là , dans ce lieu (avec une valeur adverbiale): j'y vais ou à une préposition (généralement 'à') suivie de 'cela, cette chose' (avec une valeur pronominale): n'y comptez pas; penses-y
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    mogedon

    New Member
    Australia, English
    Bonjour tout le monde.

    When translating 'there', when is y and là used?

    exemple: They went there

    Ils sont allés ou Ils y sont allés

    Is there a difference depending on the vicinity of the speaker to the object?


    Merci beaucoup
     

    demdem

    Member
    France, French
    On dira soit "ils y sont allés", soit "ils sont allés là-bas".
    Dans le cas "ils sont allés là-bas", on comprend que le lieu où ils sont allés est loin du narrateur: effectivement, il y a une idée de distance.
    "ils y sont allés" est plus neutre : on ne sait pas s'ils sont allés loin ou pas.
     

    demdem

    Member
    France, French
    Yes indeed, "ils sont allés là" would be correct if you point with your finger the place where they have been.

    In fact, the translation of "they went there" depends on what you want to emphasize.
    1. Either you want to focus on the fact that they went somewhere (to a party, or to a conference, or whereever) --> Ils y sont allés.
    2. Or you want to stress the place where they have been --> Ils sont allés là (I would say that if I had to show the place on a map) / Ils sont allés là-bas (I would say that if I had to show the place in the landscape, and if the place is a bit far from me - let's say more than 10 meters).

    This is what I understand as a French-native-speaker.
     

    verbivore

    Banned
    USA, English
    When referring to location, it seems they are interchangeable. Is this so?

    Il les y a laissés.
    Il les a laissés là.

    When speaking I sometimes forget to insert the "y", so I cover this up by saying "là" at the end instead. No one has ever corrected me on this; thus I assume "y" and "là" are interchangeable in these types of contexts.

    Thank you.
     

    jann

    co-mod'
    English - USA
    Both of your example sentences are correct, and both mean, "He left them there." So yes, both and y mean "there." The difference being that could not precede the verb the way y does, and y cannot be placed at the end of a sentence as can. This is because y is a pronoun, while is an adverb. ;)
     

    itka

    Senior Member
    français
    They mean not exactly the same.

    Je suis allée au jardin ---> j'y suis allée, but not : *je suis allée là.
    Je vais souvent à Paris ---> j'y vais souvent, but not : *je vais souvent là
    J'ai des amis à Paris ---> j'y ai des amis, but not : *j'ai des amis là.

    "Assieds-toi là !" is different from "*assieds-toi-z-y !"

    In the examples verbivore gave, the sentences are both correct but the meanings are not the same.
    Il les y a laissés ---> il les a laissés au jardin (upper mentionned)
    il les a laissés là ---> here, the place I'm showing.
    là is called a "déictique" i.e. it has no meaning but the one you show when you speak.

    Hem ! I'm afraid my explanations are not very clear... Be sure anyway, these two words are different and you cannot replace one by the other.


    I wish to precise that this sign : * means : the following sentence or expression is NOT correct (written after a question I received)
     

    verbivore

    Banned
    USA, English
    Ok. How about this then:

    Êtes-vous allé à Paris? Réponse:

    1) Non, je n'y suis jamais allé.
    2) Non, je ne suis pas allé là.

    Tous les deux marchent? Tous les deux se traduisent semblablement.
     

    verbivore

    Banned
    USA, English
    C'est bien ce que je pensais que vous diriez, mais ils se traduisent de même en anglais. Comme tel, en parlant, ne serais-je pas compris tout de même? Merci.
     

    Lullah

    New Member
    France, French
    Si, on te comprendrait. Même si à la rigueur, "je ne suis jamais allé là-bas" serait légèrement mieux, avec le là-bas en fin de phrase donc... Ca ne me semble vraiment pas être une grande faute, mais dans ce contexte la tournure en y est effectivement plus appropriée!
     

    jann

    co-mod'
    English - USA
    itka said:
    They mean not exactly the same.
    I'm sorry, I should have been clearer. I didn't mean to say that the sentences are identical. I should have said that they will both mean be translated as, "He left them there."

    But now, to be clear, a little correction about what we would say in English:
    itka said:
    il les a laissés là ---> here there, the place I'm showing.
    or
    il les a laissés ici
    ---> here, the place I'm showing.
    :)
     

    star5432

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    I know the usuage of "y" and "là" in the sentence structure (generally "y" precedes the verb and "là" is put after, no?) but I was wondering if one is more formal or better to use in certain contexts. For me, I tend to always use "là" because it is less confusing!
     

    Bléros

    Senior Member
    Jax
    USA, English
    No one is more formal than the other, but 'y' refers to an already mentioned word.

    -Dois-je mettre la nourriture sur la table?
    -Non, je l'y ai déjà mise.

    'Là' refers to an unmentioned, unspecified location. You can also use 'là' with 'bas', making 'là-bas' (over there).

    -Ne vas pas ! Ces chiens te mourdront.
    -De quoi tu parles? Où sont ces chiens méchants?
    -Dans le jardin.
    -Vraiment? Alors, je n'y irai pas.
    (OR... Je n'irai pas là-bas.)
     

    itka

    Senior Member
    français
    Alors, je n'y irai pas. (OR... Je n'irai pas là-bas.)
    We don't say "je n'y irais pas"... "y" doesn't match with the vowel "i".
    In that case we avoid to use a pronoun. We drop it or we use the complete phrase :
    - Alors je n'irai pas !
    - Alors je n'irai pas dans ce jardin !


    I wouldn't say : "je n'irai pas là-bas."
    là-bas : is a place far from here (or far in my mind)
    "Mon ami est parti en Amérique.
    - Ah bon ? Qu'est-ce qu'il fait là-bas ?"

    "Où est Paul ?
    - Au fond du jardin
    - Qu'est-ce qu'il fait là-bas ?"

    […]
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    star5432

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    So you're saying to omit the "y" when it proceedes a vowel, or is it jus the vowel "i"? Also, I've heard the "là-bas" thing before; I'd equate it to the English "over there."

    […]
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    I wouldn't say : "je n'irai pas là-bas."
    Why wouldn't là-bas be suitable? To me it is a good alternative to y:

    — Es-tu déjà allé à Paris ?
    — Non, j'irai là-bas l'année prochaine.

    Anyway I agree that it is often possible to simply drop that y:

    — Es-tu déjà allé à Paris ?
    — Non, j'irai l'année prochaine.

    So you're saying to omit the "y" when it proceedes a vowel, or is it jus the vowel "i"?
    Just the vowel i because of the hiatus…

    Il y irait s'il le pouvait. (hiatus) → Il irait s'il le pouvait.
    Il y est bien. :tick:
    Il y a un lac devant ma maison. :tick:

    Anyway I'm not sure it is always possible to omit it…
     

    itka

    Senior Member
    français
    Why wouldn't là-bas be suitable? To me it is a good alternative to y:
    — Es-tu déjà allé à Paris ?
    — Non, j'irai là-bas l'année prochaine.
    So... you agree with me ;)... I told that "là-bas" was fitting for a place far from here... I assumed that the garden Bléros spoke about was not so far...:D
     

    Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    So... you agree with me ;)... I told that "là-bas" was fitting for a place far from here... I assumed that the garden Bléros spoke about was not so far...:D
    To me it doesn't need to be far… In other words, là-bas would also be fine for the garden example even if that garden is very close.

    In short, as suggested by Star5432, I think là-bas is indeed very similar to over there
     

    itka

    Senior Member
    français
    Alors là, ça m'inquiète !
    Si tu es dans la chambre d'un appartement, est-ce que tu pourrais dire :
    «Les assiettes sont dans la cuisine, je vais là-bas les chercher» ?
    Si oui, alors c'est un suissisme ! :D

    Mais comme je l'ai dit au début, comme toujours, il y a une possibilité d'intention stylistique du locuteur. Je peux considérer qu'un lieu géographiquement proche est loin dans mon esprit ou inversement...
     

    Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    Non, je ne le dirais pas… Mais je ne dirais pas non plus :

    Les assiettes sont dans la cuisine, je vais les y chercher.

    N.B.: Je ne dis pas que ce y est faux, puisqu'il est correct, mais je ne dirais pas cette phrase spontanément…

    Mais comme je l'ai dit au début, comme toujours, il y a une possibilité d'intention stylistique du locuteur. Je peux considérer qu'un lieu géographiquement proche est loin dans mon esprit ou inversement...
    En effet !
     

    itka

    Senior Member
    français
    Non, je ne le dirais pas… Mais je ne dirais pas non plus :
    Les assiettes sont dans la cuisine, je vais les y chercher.
    Là, je suis bien d'accord, moi non plus.
    Je crois que l'enseignement du français-langue-étrangère fait une trop large place aux remplacements des compléments par Y (voir les exercices que font nos correspondants).

    En français, on ne remplace pas tant de choses que ça par Y...
     

    xtrasystole

    Senior Member
    France
    It's either 'y' or 'là', not both.


    'J'espère que tu as passé du bon temps en France, même si tu y étais pour le travail'.

    'J'espère que tu as passé du bon temps en France, même si tu étais là pour le travail'.
     

    Laürenar

    Senior Member
    France, français
    For the second sentence, it would not sound natural to my ears without the -bas:
    'J'espère que tu as passé du bon temps en France, même si tu étais là-bas pour le travail'.
     

    SophiePaquin

    Senior Member
    English-Canada
    Alors, si je voulais dire ''Just let me know when you want me to come and I'll be there'' est-ce que je pourrais dire ''[…] je serai là-(bas)/j'y serai'' ?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
    Je serais là ou J'y serais?

    Hello

    I would like to know if two these expression are correct in French. is there any difference between them?

    Thanks a lot/Merci beaucoup
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Welshie

    Senior Member
    England, English
    They are both grammatically possible:

    Je suis à ... => J'y suis => J'y serais
    Je suis là => Je serais là

    However they are different. "Je suis là" normally means either:

    1. I am physically here, in this place. Ie: "T'es où?" "Je suis là!" (Where are you?/I'm here)
    or
    2. Figuratively - I am there for you, I will support you in times of trouble.

    J'y suis is less common, I think. Aside from being a fixed expression meaning "I've worked it out", you might want to use it in occasions like this:

    "Tu vas où?" "Je vais à l'école, j'y serai pendant un moment" (Where are you going? / I'm going to school, I'll be there for a while).

    You can extend these sentences to the conditional tense if you like..
     

    frenchlady

    Senior Member
    French- France
    j'y serai (future) : implique que l'on a précisé le lieu avant : "y" remplace cité auparavant. "J'y serai " insiste vraiment sur le lieu.

    ex : Tu as rendez-vous à 10 heures, à la mairie . - OK, j'y serai.

    je serai là : insiste plus sur la présence de la personne (qu'elle soit physique, ou psychologique d'ailleurs = si tu as besoin de moi, je serai là).
     

    Dave1982

    Member
    English
    Je ne peux pas trouver quelquechose dans mon dictionnaire qui m'aide à faire la différence... Tout que je sais est qu'ils signifient "there", mais je doute qu'ils soient identique.

    J'y suis allé = Je suis allé là ?
    J'y étais = J'étais là ?

    D'autres exemples serait apprecié aussi :)

    Merci beaucoup :D

    Je suis desolée si tu ne peut pas me comprendre.
     

    itka

    Senior Member
    français
    1)
    est un adverbe de lieu.
    Il indique l'endroit où se trouve/se produit quelque chose :
    Je suis là.
    Vous travaillez là ?


    2) Y
    "y"
    fonctionne généralement comme pronom, c'est à dire qu'il remplace un complément qui a déjà été cité, pour éviter de répéter son nom.
    Je vis à Paris. - Est-ce que vous y travaillez aussi ?

    Y peut ainsi remplacer un complément de lieu introduit par la préposition "à".
    Vous allez à Paris ? Oui, nous y allons.
    Il ne peut pas remplacer un complément de lieu qui n'est pas introduit par à (sauf dans le cas exceptionnel du verbe "habiter").

    Mais "y" remplace aussi d'autres compléments, qui n'indiquent pas un lieu, s'ils sont introduits par la préposition "à" :
    Vous pensez à votre examen ? - Oui, j'y pense.

    Ces explications sont sommaires. La question est compliquée, mais tu pourras ensuite l'approfondir en lisant des livres de grammaire.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    shapirog

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Bonjour,
    I'm curious about when to use y vs là when expressing the idea of going "there". For example, if you're saying "I'm going there tomorrow" do you say "J'y vais demain" or "Je vais là demain". When would you use y and when would use là?

    merci d'avance
     

    Aoyama

    Senior Member
    français Clodoaldien
    To make things simple "J'y vais demain" is what you would use in general.
    "Je vais là demain" could be used in some special cases, when talking with someone about a given place, like :
    "Tu connais le restaurant XX ? Oui, justement, j'étais là hier soir". But you could also as well say "j'y étais hier soir".
     
    Last edited:

    shanya

    Senior Member
    french
    Hi,
    You use the "y" when you already mentionned the subject in the sentence before e.g:
    A: Tu vas chez le coiffeur là? ( means here right now)
    B: Oui, j'y vais tout de suite. (y = chez le coiffeur)

    […]
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top