FR: type it yourself! (hyphens and compléments doubles)

charlie2

Senior Member
I would appreciate some confirmation/ correction:
Question : Vous m'avez tape cette lettre?(=Did you type this letter for me?)
The question is given and I am supposed to start the answer with "Non".
Answer : Non, tapez-la-vous. (= No, you type it!)
Is my answer correct? :confused:
Thank you so much. :)
 
  • Benjy

    Senior Member
    English - English
    charlie2 said:
    I would appreciate some confirmation/ correction:
    Question : Vous m'avez tape cette lettre?(=Did you type this letter for me?)
    The question is given and I am supposed to start the answer with "Non".
    Answer : Non, tapez-la-vous. (= No, you type it!)
    Is my answer correct? :confused:
    Thank you so much. :)

    taper isnt reflexive?
     

    Nywoe

    Senior Member
    Canada: English and French
    It would be better to say "Vous avez tapé cette lettre?" or if you want to specify that it was for you "Vous avez tapé cette lettre pour moi?".

    As for the answer, it would be "Non, tapez-la vous-mêmes!" The choice of "vous" is just to stayin the same formality as the question. However, normally if you want to say "Type it yourself!" it is not in a very formal situation. In that case, in French, it would be "Non, tape-la toi-même!"

    N.
     

    charlie2

    Senior Member
    Nywoe said:
    It would be better to say "Vous avez tapé cette lettre?" or if you want to specify that it was for you "Vous avez tapé cette lettre pour moi?".
    As for the answer, it would be "Non, tapez-la vous-mêmes!" The choice of "vous" is just to stayin the same formality as the question. However, normally if you want to say "Type it yourself!" it is not in a very formal situation. In that case, in French, it would be "Non, tape-la toi-même!"

    N.

    I tend to think the same way, too. But, as I said, the question is given like that and "toi-meme" or "vous-meme" do not come as a choice in the exercise. You see, it is my homework.
    I guess "taper" can be reflexive , but the meaning in that case would not be "to type". Thanks a lot.
     

    valerie

    Senior Member
    France, French & Spanish
    I would say 'tapez-vous la' , and not tapez la vous

    and I am not sure about the -
     

    Login

    Senior Member
    Belgium - French
    Nywoe said:
    It would be better to say "Vous avez tapé cette lettre?" or if you want to specify that it was for you "Vous avez tapé cette lettre pour moi?".

    As for the answer, it would be "Non, tapez-la vous-mêmes!" The choice of "vous" is just to stayin the same formality as the question. However, normally if you want to say "Type it yourself!" it is not in a very formal situation. In that case, in French, it would be "Non, tape-la toi-même!"

    N.

    i agree but then without s at the end of même.
     

    Nywoe

    Senior Member
    Canada: English and French
    That's what I would've said too Login, but according to the dictionary, when it is "vous" or "nous" used before the "même", there is an s.....but maybe it is an exception when "vous" is only used for formality, not to designate a groupe of people....
     

    Login

    Senior Member
    Belgium - French
    Nywoe said:
    ...but maybe it is an exception when "vous" is only used for formality, not to designate a groupe of people....

    Hi Nywoe
    That's the 'rule' I remember. I'll try to find the source... :)
     

    charlie2

    Senior Member
    fetchezlavache said:
    i concur !
    Yes, and we need another hyphen (un trait d'union) between la and vous. I was taught so in the class.
    The order is like that when "le la les" meet "me te vous nous" in an affirmative imperative sentence (a l'imperatif affirmatif). Otherwise "me te vous nous" go before "le la les".
     

    Jabote

    Senior Member
    French from France
    charlie2 said:
    Yes, and we need another hyphen (un trait d'union) between la and vous. I was taught so in the class.
    The order is like that when "le la les" meet "me te vous nous" in an affirmative imperative sentence (a l'imperatif affirmatif). Otherwise "me te vous nous" go before "le la les".
    No, you don't. Hyphen between the verb and the cod, but not between the cod and the attribut...

    Am I right Fetchez ?
     

    Nico5992

    Senior Member
    France (French)
    If you want my opinion, it's "tapez-la-vous" with two hyphens (though it sounds very weird)

    But a lot of French people mistake on this point.
    So maybe I do.
     

    Jabote

    Senior Member
    French from France
    Nico5992 said:
    If you want my opinion, it's "tapez-la-vous" with two hyphens (though it sounds very weird)

    But a lot of French people mistake on this point.
    So maybe I do.

    I'm afraid there is definitely no second hyphen... Hence tapez-la vous... Donne-la moi.... Dis-le moi...
     

    valerie

    Senior Member
    France, French & Spanish
    Jabote said:
    Valerie I think the correct order would be "tapez-la vous".... Same pattern as "donne-la moi"... cod before attribut...


    I have always said 'donne moi la', but I agree that 'donne la moi' sounds more correct.
    Still without opinion about the hyphen
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    lol, that's what I said egueule!!
    So now we've both said it, Nywoe!:)
    But I keep même in the singular, even though i'd write qu'ills la tapent eux-mêmes, why? Because when vous does not designate more than one person, it is treated as a singular except for the verb following it

    A man will write to a woman vous êtes belle and no one would dream of writing belles except if there are several women of course.
     

    Nywoe

    Senior Member
    Canada: English and French
    yes, you're right...I just only thought of that exception after I had given my suggestion...oops...
     

    charlie2

    Senior Member
    I am surprised that one question in my homework would interest that many people and that there could be so many different views on it. Thank you so much.
    Suffice to say that we have done the exercise in class and my teacher said the correct answer should be "tapez-la-moi" (= you type it for me"). Yes, two hyphens, still, I am afraid.
    If only I could show you (vous, the plural form) my grammar text books. It is not even a grey area according to them.
    Is it possible that this is what is taught at school now? (I don't mean those people who thought there should be one hyphen are old, please.) :D
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    Your teacher is certainly right about the two hyphens, but the truth is language seems to evolve in such a way that most people don't bother to hyphenate anymore.
    I am not saying it is right, and you should of course learn the best possible French, but do not expect everyone to use as many hyphens as they ought to.
     

    charlie2

    Senior Member
    egueule said:
    Your teacher is certainly right about the two hyphens, but the truth is language seems to evolve in such a way that most people don't bother to hyphenate anymore.
    I am not saying it is right, and you should of course learn the best possible French, but do not expect everyone to use as many hyphens as they ought to.
    My God! That's exactly what I mean by my last sentence. :thumbsup:
     

    Nywoe

    Senior Member
    Canada: English and French
    I was just reading the play Bousille et les justes, by Gratien Gélinas, and I happened to notice that he did use two hyphens between two pronouns, following a verb:

    "Toi, si tu veux témoigner, tu te feras entendre la crécelle devant le juge demain. Pour l'instant, c'est moi qui ai le crachoir. Et tiens-toi-le pour dit. Autrement je claque la porte."

    I just thought it was interesting to see that such a reknowned author used it that way.

    N. :)
     

    pen

    Senior Member
    Honduras/Spanish
    egueule said:
    So now we've both said it, Nywoe!:)
    But I keep même in the singular, even though i'd write qu'ills la tapent eux-mêmes, why? Because when vous does not designate more than one person, it is treated as a singular except for the verb following it

    A man will write to a woman vous êtes belle and no one would dream of writing belles except if there are several women of course.

    This is correct Nick!

    pen
     
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