FR: venir de l'/d'Angleterre, de (la) France, du Canada - article devant les noms de pays

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lilliputthegreat

Senior Member
English; United Kingdom
I've read in a French text book that <<de>> preceeds the name of a feminine country starting with a consonant and <<d'>> preceeds the name of a country (masculine or femnine) starting with a vowel. Therefore, wouldn't it be proper to say <<je viens d'Angleterre>> instead of << je viens de l'Angleterre?>> If no, why so?

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Moderator note: Multiple threads merged to create this one. This thread is specifically about venir de. See also our language resources about countries as well as the following threads:
FR: de (la) France - article
de (la) France, de l'/d'Angleterre, etc. - article devant les noms de pays après "de" ? - forum Français Seulement
 
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  • anangelaway

    Senior Member
    French
    lilliputthegreat said:
    <<je viens d'Angleterre>> :tick: instead of << je viens de l'Angleterre?>>:cross:
    <<Je suis partie en Angleterre>>:tick: ou <<Je suis partie à l'Angleterre>>:cross:
    Bonsoir ! :)

    The following link provided by Aupick at once, will surely absorbs your doubts.
    I'm sure someone will post an interesting explanation.
     

    semiller

    Senior Member
    USA-English
    Bonjour! I've heard some people say, "Je viens de France" and others say "Je viens de la France." Are both correct? I always thought that the "la" in the second sentence is not required. If so, does this rule apply to all feminine countries? Examples would include "Je viens de Belgique," "Je viens de Suisse, etc. Merci bien!
     

    Donaldos

    Senior Member
    French - France
    As far as I am concerned, I would only say "Je viens de France" (no article).
     

    SonnenscheinANA

    New Member
    German-Germany
    Wow. That's a good site.

    It made all sense to me until I came across one of my exercises in the French book.

    So you have to say: Il vient de Bretagne (feminine)
    or you have to say: Il vient du Canada. (masculine)

    All good up to here until the book said: Il vient de LA Cote d'Ivoire. But why that now?

    Also, the website above with the link says "Il vient de Cote d'Ivoire" but the book says LA, so is the book wrong?

    Thanks for your help!
     

    mmepixie

    Member
    Canadian English
    Bonjour,

    Est-ce qu'on dit "Je viens de Canada" ou "Je viens du Canada". Egalement, Je viens de la France/de France? Encore plus, "au sud de la France" ou "au sud de France"? Ce sont des questions grammaticals qui me laissent perplexe depuis un bon bout de temps.

    Merci par avance.
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    I think it depends on the place. For example, I'd say "Je viens de France" but "Je viens du Canada". I think it's a masculine-feminine thing.

    However, it's easiest just to say "Je suis canadien/français."
     

    grenouille182

    Senior Member
    si le pays est du genre féminim on dit : Je viens de France, Je viens de Slovaquie, Je viens de Colombie
    et si le pays est du genre masculin on dit : Je viens du Canada, je viens du Vénézuéla, je viens du Libéria etc. ...
    c´est correct ce que j´ai écrit ?
     

    wordreferant

    New Member
    English
    I'm confused by these: Je viens de Australie. Je viens d'Inde. Je viens de Indonésie. Je viens d'Ukraine. What's the rule with vowels? Usually d' but why sometimes is it de?
     

    janpol

    Senior Member
    France - français
    Je viens de Australie. Je viens d'Inde. Je viens de Indonésie. Je viens d'Ukraine.
    e a = deux voyelles >>> hiatus, même remarque pour e i.
    Il faut élider le "de" >>> d'Australie, d'Indonésie
     

    Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    When the name of a country starts with a vowel (except Y), you have to do the elision.

    Je viens de Australie/Indonésie :cross:Je viens d'Australie/Indonésie. :tick:
     

    profenfloride

    New Member
    English
    Why isn’t an article used with venir with feminine countries (ex: venir de France), but it is with masculine countries (ex: venir du Canada)? Isn’t the “du” a contraction of “de” and “le”?
     

    Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    Yes, du is indeed the contraction of preposition de and definite article le in this case. And that's the very reason you can't omit it because the preposition can never be omitted – you require de/d', du, des. In other words, as la and l' are the only two definite articles that don't contract with de, they are the only ones you may omit.

    venir de la France :tick: / venir de France :tick:
    venir de l'Angleterre :tick: / venir d'Angleterre :tick:

    venir du Canada :tick: / venir Canada :cross:
    venir des États-Unis :tick: / venir États-Unis :cross:
     

    mancunienne girl

    Senior Member
    English - England
    This just came up again. Why "Je viens de Australie" but "Je viens d'Argentine?". Why is one "d'" and the other "de". Les deux sont féminins et les deux commencent avec "A".:confused:
     

    Sawa99

    New Member
    polish
    je viens de la France= j'arrive de la France
    je viens de France= je suis français (ou au moins résident)
    Ca marche aussi avec les noms de pays masculins?
    p.ex.
    Je viens du Canada = j'arrive du Canada
    Je viens de Canada = je suis canadien ?

    ou on dit : "Je viens du Canada" pour les deux opptions?

    Merci
     

    Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    On ne peut pas dire venir de Canada :cross: ; l'article est obligatoire dans ce cas. Comme je l'ai dit :
    as la and l' are the only two definite articles that don't contract with de, they are the only ones you may omit.

    Quoi qu'il en soit, même si ce n'est pas faux, je ne dirais personnellement pas Je viens de la France. Je dirais : Je reviens de France.
     
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