FR: Veuillez recevoir mes salutations distinguées

curius

Member
Bantu
'Veuillez recevoir mes salutations distinguées.'

I believe the meaning of this phrase to be a form of pleasantry or flattery. Still it is given as an order (?!)

As a wish would it not be:?

'[Je souhaite que vous ]Vouliez recevoir mes salutations distinguées.'


In a different context I would agree:

'Veuillez mettre vos mains en l'air ou je tire.'

But in the first case I would tell you where to stick your salutations if you were trying to order me around.
Or is this subtle sarcasm to the higher-ups?
Anyone?
 
  • Maître Capello

    Mod et ratures
    French – Switzerland
    You are mistaken, Curius. It is not a wish but a very polite request, whence the imperative, which is similarly used in English.

    Please receive my distinguished greetings. (even though "distinguished greetings" is obviously non idiomatic)
     

    curius

    Member
    Bantu
    Yes but notice how the present subjunctive is similar and many many times it is the exact same word as the imperative. Which should really be called the facultative.
     

    OLN

    Senior Member
    French - France, ♀
    Vouliez (present subjunctive) and veuillez (imperative) are different in spelling and pronunciation.

    What are the many verbs where they are the exact same?
     

    J.F. de TROYES

    Senior Member
    francais-France
    Yes but notice how the present subjunctive is similar and many many times it is the exact same word as the imperative. .
    It's often right for the singular , not for the plural ( mangez/ que vous mangiez ; finissez/que vous finissiez ; recevez/ que vous receceviez ... ) except for avoir ( aie, ayez ) and être ( sois, soyez ).

    I'll just add the sentence is a ready-made phrase chiefly used at the end of a letter as Sincerely yours in English.
     
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