FR: You no longer need them

Niler

New Member
English
[…] tu n'en as plus besoin.

Do not eat food that is too salty, you no longer need them.

Is this correct?


Context is an infomal email to friend regarding dietary advice

Merci d'avance
 
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  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    This sentence doesn't make sense to me in English (there are three issues: lack of singular/plural agreement, the verb tense in the second clause, and a comma splice):
    Do not eat food that is too salty, you no longer need them.
    That being said, "tu n'en as plus besoin" does seem like a perfect translation of "you no longer need them"...
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Neither "friandises" or "les aliments riche en grasse" could mean "food that is too salty," though. (Again, watch out for singular/plural issues in English and French.) I'm also confused about the logic here - do you ever "need" snack food? Your sentence implies that in the past this person needed to eat food that was too salty. The verb might be wrong.

    What are you trying to say in English? What's the situation? What's the context?
     

    Niler

    New Member
    English
    Thanks for response - in English

    If you are peckish do not snack sweets, or salty/fatty foods, you no longer need them.

    The context - as above - is an informal email about a diet they have started and I'm giving advice -

    tu n'en aura plus besoin

    works better.

    they being a close friend
     
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    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    OK, I'm getting a better sense of what you're saying here. But still, there are problems in your English sentence. My advice is that you should try never to translate poorly-formulated sentences. The bold sections show problematic areas in the original sentence.
    If you are peckish do not snack sweets, or salty/fatty foods, you no longer need them.
    Do you really mean "no longer" in English? Did this person need "sweets and salty/fatty foods" at one time? "No longer" implies that once this person did need to "snack on sweets or salty/fatty foods."
     

    Niler

    New Member
    English
    I'm new to forum and at work - not paying enough attention to what I'm writing. The sentence fits in after I've already acknowledged that the other person has started a diet. No longer is not what I mean to say - a simple ne pas works fine.

    Apologies, plus d'attention nécessaire de ma part.

    Thanks for input.
     

    Oddmania

    Senior Member
    French
    Hi,

    I totally agree with Lucas, tu n'en as plus besoin really struck me when I read your first post. It sounds like you're mocking a "fat" kid, saying Maybe you used to need grease when you were a skinny toddler, but now you definitely can't afford to get any fatter! You don't need any more (fatty food).
     
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