FR: You would/should/could have been gone

CXavier

Member
San Francisco,USA English
Pouvez-vous m'aider traduire s'il vous plaît
C'est correct?

You would have been gone all night
Vous seriez été aller toute la nuit

You should have been gone all night
Vous auriez dû être aller toute la nuit

You could have been gone all night
Vous auriez pu être aller toute la nuit
 
  • SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    My tries:

    You would have been gone all night - Tu serais sorti toute la nuit
    Vous seriez été aller toute la nuit

    You should have been gone all night - Tu aurais du être sorti toute la nuit
    Vous auriez dû être aller toute la nuit

    You could have been gone all night - Tu aurais pu être sorti toute la nuit.
    Vous auriez pu être aller toute la nuit

    More context would be helpful (a whole sentence, for example).
     

    aliseb

    Member
    English - American
    Good job, Pipsy. Just a note on the original English sentence :

    You would have been gone all night, if you had the chance

    Remember, that "would've" goes with "had had" and not simply "had"; eg., You would've been gone all night if you had had the chance. Getting the English right will always help you with the French. I had a great book back in school, English Grammar for Students of French which you might like to check out.
     

    Glat64

    Senior Member
    English
    Just a thought from a bad french speaker but shouldn't, "You would have been gone all night be... Tu aurais été allé/parti... toute la nuit si tu avais l'opportunité.

    Oh dear, I see where I am missing the point now. It's to do with that verb être again isn't it:eek:

    Still a tad confused by the lack of the word been though ie... why not... Je serais été sorti... but as I'm typing I think I've answered my own question. Is it because we are using être and not avoir as the auxilary verb that we don't use été ? As in... I would be been :rolleyes:

    Merci d'avance
     
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    Viobi

    Senior Member
    Françoué (standard)
    When être needs an auxiliary, it's always avoir, regardless of the status (auxiliary or verb) of être.

    Pierre est un grand acteur. / Pierre a été un grand acteur. / Si Pierre avait été un grand acteur, il aurait obtenu davantage de rôles. (être is a verb)

    Paul mange des frites. / Paul a mangé des frites. / Les frites ont été mangées par Paul. (passive voice, être is an auxiliary).

    You would have gone to a hotel if you hadn't found an evening train home.
    Tu serais allé(e) à l'hôtel si tu n'avais pas trouvé un train du soir pour rentrer chez toi.

    You should have gone to a hotel, not slept at the station!
    Tu aurais aller à l'hôtel, pas dormir à la gare! [mind the accent on "dû", past participle of "devoir"]

    You could have gone to a hotel, you didn't have to sleep at the station!
    Tu aurais pu aller à l'hôtel, tu n'étais pas obligé(e) de dormir à la gare!

    I hope this helps.
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hullo,
    I've never in my life seen such forms as "être aller" and " été aller".
    Shouldn't "être" be followed by a past participle?
    Best.
    GS
     

    Viobi

    Senior Member
    Françoué (standard)
    Definitely. As we tell kids, when in doubt, replace with a 2nd-group verb, and you'll hear it: "être fini", not "être finir", so "être allé", not "être aller"! :)
     

    Glat64

    Senior Member
    English
    Hi thanks for your help, I really appreciate the effort :). I knew that être's auxillary verb is avoir, but I was referring to the use of Sortir's auxilary verb ... être. What I was questioning is this... If, for example...

    I would have been lost without you is ... J'aurais été perdu sans vous. Why isn't...

    You would have been gone all night
    , not ... Tu aurait été sorti/parti/allé ?

    To my confused English brain Tu serais sorti toute la nuit... means you would be out all night.

    Apologies if I'm missing something glaringly obvious here.

    Merci encore.

    Ps. I think I've learnt this in the past and I will probably kick myself when the answer comes but why is aller in the infinitive in this sentence..Tu aurais pu aller à l'hôtel, tu n'étais pas obligé(e) de dormir à la gare! and not allé ? It sounds like... You would have been able to go. Instead of... You could have gone.
     

    Viobi

    Senior Member
    Françoué (standard)
    You've surely learnt it at some point, yes, as it's drilled into school kids: "Quan-deu-ver-beu-seu-sui-veu, leu-deu-ziè-mè-ta-lin-fi-ni-tif" (choir, please chant heartily:D).
    When in doubt, try a second-group or third-group verb, you'll hear the R if there's one: "tu aurais pu venir".

    Actually, "tu aurais été parti toute la nuit" is correct. But the usual phrasing is "tu aurais été absent" / "tu te serais absenté".

    "Tu aurais été allé":cross:doesn't work, both because aller calls for a complement (you can't say "il est allé" without saying where) and because you can't string auxiliaries in French as you do in English (think of the nightmare it is for a French student to dissect a sentence like "He might have been being questioned by the police." ). In fact, in "il a été parti une heure", "parti" is arguably used as an adjective: "être parti" works as "être absent".
    Other instances of "avoir été+ past participle" imply the passive voice.

    "Il est sorti" is either "He has gone/went out" (action, movement, passé composé) or "he is away", "he is not home" (present, state, sorti works as an adjective, as in "il est couché", "he's in bed").

    So, "tu serais sorti toute la nuit" is a bit confusing, because you can analyse it, depending on the context, either as the conditional past of "sortir" or as the conditional present of "être"+ adj (sorti):

    In the first case, it will translate as "You would have been out all night (if you had had the chance); in the second case, it will translate as "You would be out all night" (if your mum let you), as in:
    "Tu resterais dehors/debout toute la nuit (si tu pouvais)."
     
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