Frail young grass grow out from under debris and rubble

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Infinite1128

Member
Mandarin- China
My friends:

The prepositions in the following sentence leave me feeling at sea. I'd appreciate your advices for me.


Frail young grass grow out from under debris and rubble.


To be frank, frequently I get confused about the prepositions in English. Take this sentence, why there are three prepositions and they closely link to each other? I am wondering whether following assumptions will make sense:

1. Frail young grass grow out under debris and rubble.

2. Frail young grass grow out from debris and rubble.

3. Frail young grass grow from under debris and rubble.

4. Frail young grass grow from debris and rubble.

So, can the sentence work if some prepositions are omitted?

un saludo
:)
 
  • DaylightDelight

    Senior Member
    Japanese - Tokyo
    You are separating the phrase at wrong places:
    Frail young grass grow out / from / under debris and rubble.
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    There's no real difference between the original sentence and (3).

    3. Frail young grass grow from under debris and rubble.

    2,4 - Grass can't grow from/out from just debris and rubble (it needs earth and water, which may be underneath the rubble).
    1 - Grass doesn't "grow out under" debris and rubble (if it is under the rubble, it isn't "out").
     

    Infinite1128

    Member
    Mandarin- China
    There's no real difference between the original sentence and (3).

    3. Frail young grass grow from under debris and rubble.

    2,4 - Grass can't grow from/out from just debris and rubble (it needs earth and water, which may be underneath the rubble).
    1 - Grass doesn't "grow out under" debris and rubble (if it is under the rubble, it isn't "out").

    Dear velisarius:

    I'm so indeted to your help. Your illustrations are easy to follow, so I have understood the sentences except the first one : 1 - Grass doesn't "grow out under" debris and rubble (if it is under the rubble, it isn't "out").

    I'm a little bit confused about your explanation in the brackets. It would be very nice of you to make a further explanation. Thank you!
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I'll try...

    If you say "grass grows out under debris and rubble", the idea of "growing out" is opposed to the idea of the grass being "under debris", so I get a conflicting mental picture from the phrase. I imagine the grass growing out of the ground, but being trapped underneath the debris. It's understandable, but not as clear as the original sentence. By adding "from", you can show more clearly that there is movement: the grass that grows under the debris is pushing its way out "from" underneath it.

    Compare: (i) The woman's hair was poking out from under her hat.
    (ii) The woman's hair was poking out under her hat.


    Sentence (i) shows that some hair is "escaping" from under the hat. In (ii) I get the idea that the woman's hair is poking out of her head, underneath her hat. There is nothing to tell me that some of the hair is not under the hat and is visible.

    (Note that "grass" takes a singular verb. "Grasses grow" is possible, but it would mean "various types of grasses grow".)
     

    Infinite1128

    Member
    Mandarin- China
    I'll try...

    If you say "grass grows out under debris and rubble", the idea of "growing out" is opposed to the idea of the grass being "under debris", so I get a conflicting mental picture from the phrase. I imagine the grass growing out of the ground, but being trapped underneath the debris. It's understandable, but not as clear as the original sentence. By adding "from", you can show more clearly that there is movement: the grass that grows under the debris is pushing its way out "from" underneath it.

    Compare: (i) The woman's hair was poking out from under her hat.
    (ii) The woman's hair was poking out under her hat.


    Sentence (i) shows that some hair is "escaping" from under the hat. In (ii) I get the idea that the woman's hair is poking out of her head, underneath her hat. There is nothing to tell me that some of the hair is not under the hat and is visible.

    (Note that "grass" takes a singular verb. "Grasses grow" is possible, but it would mean "various types of grasses grow".)
    Awesome! Your illustrations are pitch perfect! Now, I understand that and I feel excited! Thank you so much, my friends!
    Thanks for your patience and kindness. :)
     
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