free available to the periphery

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shiningstar

Senior Member
turkish
Hi

In a technical manual about turbine overspeed protection system I encountered a phrase which I couldn't understand whether it refers to the sales of the sensors, e.g. free delivery, or something else. Here is the context.

"Each of the three Monitor Modules
has a photo-mos relay output (breaking overspeed trip circuit). Any failure
of sensor or measuring function detected also sets the trip output to overspeed
position. Further, each channel releases its own failure warning signal,
free available to the periphery as N/C contact."

It seems irrelevant with the first part of the sentence.

What could this bold part mean?
 
  • JustKate

    Senior Member
    I know diddly-squat (translation: nothing at all!) about turbine overspeed protection systems, but I wonder if the free should instead be freely? Does that help at all?
     
    Last edited:

    shiningstar

    Senior Member
    turkish
    I know diddly-squat (translation: nothing at all!) about turbine overspeed protection systems, but I wonder if the free should instead be freely? Does that help at all?
    It certainly sounds better now, I get what it means at least and that's what important to me. Thanks a lot :)
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    shiningstar, I suspect that the text was not written by a native English speaker - it contains a number of minor errors. If free should be freely I would suggest that each channel's failure warning signal is readily (=freely) available outside the turbine assembly (to the periphery) as a normally-closed (N/C) contact.
     

    shiningstar

    Senior Member
    turkish
    shiningstar, I suspect that the text was not written by a native English speaker - it contains a number of minor errors. If free should be freely I would suggest that each channel's failure warning signal is readily (=freely) available outside the turbine assembly (to the periphery) as a normally-closed (N/C) contact.
    You're right Andyc. I think the original text is in German, I see some German words here and there in the text. Thanks for the explanation. Especially for that "to the periphery" part. Although I know now that I got that part right there was a slight doubt about it.
     
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