free = is allowed

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Encolpius

Senior Member
Hungarian
Good morning ladies & gentlemen, I know only Hungarian and Polish which use the word "free" to express the phrase to be allowed. Do you know about other languages with the same expression.

Polish:
Nie wolno kraść.
no + free + steal

Hungarian:
Nem szabad lopni.
no + free + steal

Thank you in advance & have a productive day.
Encolpius from Prague
 
  • Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Good morning ladies & gentlemen, I know only Hungarian and Polish which use the word "free" to express the phrase to be allowed.
    Not in Russian, basically, although some words for "allow" are related to the word "freedom"/"will". On the other hand, these words (pozvólit' + arch. dozvólit') are likely Polonisms.
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Would you accept the Welsh word hawl (n.f.) in that it means 'a right' or 'a claim' but also 'permission' (in computer speak)? I suppose in the last case you can say you have 'the right' or 'the freedom' to access something (e.g. a program, an application) on your computer. (We also use caniatâd (n.m.) for 'permission' in computer and general language.)
     

    Rocko!

    Senior Member
    Español - México
    At least in Mexican Spanish, it's possible:
    Usted no es libre de robar lo que usted quiera = You are not allowed to steal whatever you want.
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    Portuguese also allows Você é livre de roubar o que quiser, but I don't think it's what Encolpius is asking about. In Polish and Hungarian the expressions are impersonal, they don't have a subject, and the word wolno/szabad are probably adverbs (szabad can also be an adjective) followed by a verb in the infinitive.
     

    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    I have difficulty imagining when “No stealing allowed.” might be required.
    I am more familiar with “Please Beware of Pickpockets!”
    or in French
    “ATTENTION! Méfiez- vous des voleurs à la tire!”

    You are free to choose, but you are not free from the consequence of your choice.
    So one can choose to steal, but must suffer the consequences if caught.
     
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    bearded

    Senior Member
    In Italian we would not use 'free' with the verb 'to steal' : non sei libero di rubare (you are not free to steal) sounds odd.
    But phrases like sei libero di scegliere (you are free to choose) or sei libero di andare dove vuoi (you are free to go wherever you want to) are very common, and 'free' means 'allowed' in a broader sense - even when nobody actually 'allows'.
     

    merquiades

    Senior Member
    English (USA Northeast)
    "free to do something" meaning "be allowed to" is used in many expressions, many of them fixed, but I don't think it can extended to every single context possible in the language. Actually it usually sounds weird.

    You're free to come and go as you please
    You're free to decide on your own
    We're done. You're free to go now.
    You're free to do what you want.
    You're free to visit at your leisure.
     
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    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    On a sidenote: in Russian the direct analogue of "free to do sth" will be used only in those cases where it can be actually reformulated as "has a freedom to do sth"; a legal calque from European languages.
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    After all, quite interesting examples from Romance languages & English, too. The funny thing is, the Hungarian "szabad" is somehow not used wihout negative, so it works in English, but not in Hungarian. But, I am starting to have doubts. It is an issue for Hungarian thread.
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    On a sidenote: in Russian the direct analogue of "free to do sth" will be used only in those cases where it can be actually reformulated as "has a freedom to do sth"; a legal calque from European languages.
    Awwal, would you please be more specific and write some nice examples as Merquiades did. You know I am quite interested din Russian. ;)
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    From Ruscorpora.ru:
    В мире, где каждый человек свободен упасть до самого низа. - In the world where every man is free to fall to the bottom.
    Риторика при этом абсолютно либеральная: ты, мол, свободен выбирать. - While the rhetoric is absolutely liberal: you, they say, are free to choose.
    Адам не был свободен выбирать, есть или не есть плоды с древа познания... - Adam wasn't free to choose if he should eat the fruits from the tree of the knowledge.
    Человек свободен делать все, что не ограничивает свободу других людей. - Each has a freedom to do everything which doesn't infringe freedom of other people (a slightly rephrased quotation from Herbert Spencer).

    It actually seems that the calque originally came through Church Slavonic (as many other calques from Greek and Latin did). When you study the corpus, it's hard to miss two things: comparatively high frequency of religious contexts and high frequency of "свободен выбирать" (~"free to choose", "has the freedom of choice").
     

    marco_2

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Good morning ladies & gentlemen, I know only Hungarian and Polish which use the word "free" to express the phrase to be allowed. Do you know about other languages with the same expression.

    Polish:
    Nie wolno kraść.
    no + free + steal

    Hungarian:
    Nem szabad lopni.
    no + free + steal

    Thank you in advance & have a productive day.
    Encolpius from Prague
    In Western Ukraine they also used to say не вільно, but I'm not sure if it is not regional or obsolete now.
     

    Demiurg

    Senior Member
    German
    "free to do something" meaning "be allowed to" is used in many expressions, many of them fixed, but I don't think it can extended to every single context possible in the language. Actually it usually sounds weird.

    You're free to come and go as you please
    ...
    That's similar in German:

    Es steht dir frei, zu kommen und zu gehen wie es dir beliebt.

    But with a negation and "to steal" it sounds strange:

    Es steht dir nicht frei zu stehlen. (lit. You're not free to steal). :confused:
     
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