freelancer

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Ailec13

New Member
español
Hi,
What is correct "I worked as a freelancer" or "I worked as freelancer" with or without the article?
Many thanks.

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  • e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    In sentences like this, the article is always used. Another example: She was a nurse before she got married.
    But in sentences where there is only one person doing the job, you generally leave the out:
    In 1990 he worked as head nurse at XX Hospital.
     

    hopefultoo

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I worked as a freelancer. I was a freelance employee.
    I worked freelance = I did freelance work. This was the type of work I had.

    I cannot quite agree with e2efour above, I'm afraid, when he says:

    But in sentences where there is only one person doing the job, you generally leave the out:
    In 1990 he worked as head nurse at XX Hospital.

    The article is missing because its function has been taken by the adjective. We cannot write:

    In 1990 he worked as nurse at XX Hospital.

    Compare:

    He worked as Chaplain to the university.
    This is because there is only one chaplain - the article is not used because the noun is already definite.
    He server as Brigadier in x regiment.
    This is because there is only one brigadier - the article is not used because the noun is already definite.

    In the example above there are many nurses. However, at a school which employs one nurse I could say;

    I'm going to see nurse or I'm going to see Nurse. (I prefer the second example here)
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    hopefultoo said:
    In 1990 he worked as head nurse at XX Hospital.

    The article is missing because its function has been taken by the adjective.
    He teaches as an associate professor at XX University.

    Would you omit the article here? To me it would read as if there were only one.
     

    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    I think you omit the article "a" only when it is a title in fact or in function - Brigadier, Chaplain, Chief Justice, or Head Nurse.
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Associate professor is a title. It just isn't one that identifies the holder as unique in an organization. If it were, we would omit the article "the", which was e2efour's point to begin with. Whether one omits "the" when the adjective is used to identify the one person it describes, or whether the function of "the" has been taken by the adjective is a sort of Chicken V. Egg argument. As I see it, hopefultoo would favor one side or the other.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    He teaches as an associate professor at XX University.

    Would you omit the article here? To me it would read as if there were only one.
    i would do this:
    He teaches as a professor at the university.
    He teaches as an associate professor at the university.
    He is the chairman of the board at a large company.
    He is a board member of several companies.
     

    Ailec13

    New Member
    español
    Thanks a lot for your help ;)

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    hopefultoo

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Yes.


    No. At least in the US, these are different things; a freelancer is not an employee. (There are important legal and other differences.)
    This is true in the UK as well. However, loosely, we can speak of ourselves as freelance employees. On the net we can read about freelance employee rights and freelance employee contracts. I think the use in the example is unexceptional.

    Freelance, of course, originally referred to a mercenary soldier who was both free, and an employee of sorts.
     

    hopefultoo

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Associate professor is a title. It just isn't one that identifies the holder as unique in an organization. If it were, we would omit the article "the", which was e2efour's point to begin with. Whether one omits "the" when the adjective is used to identify the one person it describes, or whether the function of "the" has been taken by the adjective is a sort of Chicken V. Egg argument. As I see it, hopefultoo would favor one side or the other.
    Interesting . . . I suppose He teaches as an associate professor at XX University indicates that there are several such professors.

    and

    He teaches as Associate Professor at XX University is a title.

    It's not surprising that non-natives have so much trouble with this.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I'd simply say, "He's an associate professor at XXX University." I wouldn't cap the rank and I wouldn't mention teaching; it's assumed that's what professors do.
     
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