freemasons 'Uninvited'

Blower's daughter

Senior Member
Spanish London
Hi guys I just love this song but there are some parts that simply I don't get :eek:. So please I need some help with:

1.She says 'You are uninvited, an unfortunate slight' No estas invitado, eres un desafortunado menudo??? It does not make too much sense in Spanish.

2. 'Must be somewhat heartening to watch shepherd meet shepherd' Debe ser alentador observar al pastor encontrarse con el pastor???

Thanks in advance
Saludos
 
  • Jorge Jodra

    Senior Member
    Spanish- Spain
    Hola,
    Aquí slight significa desprecio
    Yo creo que la segunda frase quiere decir: Debe de ser alentador contemplar una reunión de pastores. En España hay un dicho que reza: reunión de pastores, oveja muerta. La frase tiene múltiples aplicaciones. A veces se utiliza para referirse a una reunión de personas bien avenidas (incluso amigas) que tratan de asuntos que les importan o que simplemente celebran una fiesta. Creo que el comentario de la persona que no ha sido invitada puede estar lleno de despecho y que la idea que subyace es que después de todo a él no se le había perdido nada en esa reunión porque él no es un pastor.
     

    apathet

    Senior Member
    USA (English)
    The problem here is with the use of "slight" as a noun. The word simply isn't used that way in grammatically correct prose. However, with poetry and with songs, all the rules of grammar go out the window and you can use any word as a noun, as a verb, or even make up nonsensical words if you so choose. To this day I still don't know what Gustavo Cerati meant when he said "ella usó mi cabeza como un revólver". I understand the words, and I think I get the meaning, but I try not to dwell on it too much. Here, Alanis is making reference to a person who is frail, trivial, and unimportant. And for reasons due to rhythm and rhyme, she needed to use one word that could express that emotion.

    By the way, Damien Rice is awesome ;)
     

    Blower's daughter

    Senior Member
    Spanish London
    The problem here is with the use of "slight" as a noun. The word simply isn't used that way in grammatically correct prose. However, with poetry and with songs, all the rules of grammar go out the window and you can use any word as a noun, as a verb, or even make up nonsensical words if you so choose. To this day I still don't know what Gustavo Cerati meant when he said "ella usó mi cabeza como un revólver". I understand the words, and I think I get the meaning, but I try not to dwell on it too much. Here, Alanis is making reference to a person who is frail, trivial, and unimportant. And for reasons due to rhythm and rhyme, she needed to use one word that could express that emotion.

    By the way, Damien Rice is awesome ;)
    Hahaha thanks a lot. And by the way Damien Rice sings proper English! very easy to understand.
    Saludos
     

    Blower's daughter

    Senior Member
    Spanish London
    So "Lonelily" is "proper English"? ;) It's understandable, but so is "slight" ;)
    Honestly, I had to check the lyrics, because there was no way I could understand more than 4 words from the song (still don't know how I love it so much..), and I tried my collegues to understand the lyrics and no way, not even the British ones can tell me what it she talking about, funny isn't it?
    I meant the way he speaks, it is so clear and nice. For instead the version of the song I have got, when she says 'unfortunated slight' it sounds like ( in spanish ehhh? 'anfortuneeeeee slai' and it should be 'anfortuneitid' (more or less), shouldn't it?

    Saludos
     

    apathet

    Senior Member
    USA (English)
    I think it just has more to do with singing styles, really. In Spanish fonetics I believe it would be something like "an-for-chun-et". That song is rather difficult to understand, though, even for me. I would have to look up the lyrics if I wanted to know everything she says.
     
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