Freesheet

Hotmale

Senior Member
Polish
I've recently found on the internet a sentence that "Metro" is a freesheet. I'm wondering if it's a common name such as broadsheet or tabloid, in other words if you really use this term as there's no mention of it in my dictonaries.

Thank you
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hotmale, it would help greatly if you could share with us at least the country where such things are mentioned.

    I haven't heard the term in the U.S. newspaper industry.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    That site clearly shows that the newspaper and the conversation is in the U.K., which you could have provided at the outset.

    Perhaps one of our U.K. members will be familiar with the term.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I live near London and I've never heard it used - I wonder if "freesheet" it is specialised jargon. My son, 24yo, says (without prompting) he has heard Metro called a "freesheet" but the usual term is "free newspaper." I get the distinct impression that this is a neologism being forcibly coined.
     

    Hotmale

    Senior Member
    Polish
    That site clearly shows that the newspaper and the conversation is in the U.K., which you could have provided at the outset.

    Perhaps one of our U.K. members will be familiar with the term.
    When I was reading that conversation, I didn't pay attention to these people's nationality.

    I live near London and I've never heard it used - I wonder if "freesheet" it is specialised jargon. My son, 24yo, says (without prompting) he has heard Metro called a "freesheet" but the usual term is "free newspaper." I get the distinct impression that this is a neologism being forcibly coined.
    Probably you're right. So either it is a jargon or neologism.
    Thanks :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    The original reference was to "free sheet," not "freesheet." In AE, a "sheet"—a single piece of paper, possibly printed on both sides—that was distributed without charge could be called a "free sheet." This would not be a neologism or special term but just a common noun modified by a common adjective. Perhaps BE doesn't commonly use one or both of "free" for "gratis" and "sheet" for "piece of paper," so that the combination is a novel one.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Perhaps BE doesn't commonly use one or both of "free" for "gratis" and "sheet" for "piece of paper," so that the combination is a novel one.
    BrE certainly uses "free" for "gratis" and "sheet" for "piece of paper". What's more unusual is using "sheet" to mean "newspaper", other than in the combination "broadsheet" (which describes a particular newspaper format). The OED has examples of "sheet = newspaper" going back to 1754, but describes it as Now chiefly U.S.

    I hadn't come across "free sheet"/"freesheet" before this thread, but would probably have worked out the meaning by analogy with "broadsheet".
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    New to me, but not the OED:
    freesheet n. orig. and chiefly Brit. a newspaper or other publication distributed free of charge.
    1970 Financial Times 13 Apr. 6/5 One challenge came from the growth of the free sheet distribution from under 1m. copies a week to over 5m. in less than 12 months.
    1991 Time Out 13 Mar. 23/2 They'd read all about it in their local freesheet.
    2001 P. Burston Shameless ix. 123 [His] face was never missing from the pages of the gay freesheets.
     
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