French fries (french fries) / Venetian blinds (venetian blinds) [Capitalisation of 'national modifiers']

Diddy

Senior Member
Spanish
Hi forum!!!

I want to know why the noun: venetian blinds is written in small letter, and I have found French fries sometines written capitalized and sometimes with small letter?

If both names come from proper names, what is the difference in writing one and the other?

Which one is the correct way of writing French fries/french fries?

As there are so many names that come from proper names, how to know when to capitalize those?

Thanks in advance,
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hello Diddy

    These are style issues. It all depends upon the style guide you are following.

    The Associated Press Stylebook (Used by nearly all U.S. newspapers and journalism schools), says it's "french fries" but is silent on "venetian blinds, but I suspect it's lower case.
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    My Harper Collins Handbook for Writers is my usual reference. It carries many rules concerning capitals or uncapitalizing. Some of these rules are complex. It does not address your question because, as clan Graham says, "It is a matter of style." I need to refer to the handbook and every writer I know handles capitals the same way.
     

    Diddy

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thanks a lot sdgraham and Harry Batt for your replies! That means if I never capitalize them, there is no grammatical mistake as, could it be understood that it is the style I have chosen to write those?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    You would generally be right, according to several punctuation guides (see the resources post in the sticky at the top of this forum). But you can't simply adopt your own style for such things and have everyone accept it.
    If you are writing something to send to XXXX it is possible that XXXX has a standard, a style, that they follow. If there is, then you should follow that style.
     

    Diddy

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Thanks all for your explanations...
    You are right panjandrum... it is not just to adopt my own style,
    I now got it!
     

    Natsuna

    Senior Member
    Japanese / 日本語
    << --- threads merged here --- >>
    The company has faced difficulties after customers complained of finding foreign objects in its food, including a human tooth, prompting the company to announce preventive measures including store cleanings and inspections. Labor disputes at U.S. ports also forced it to ration french fries.


    Source: McDonald’s Japan Closing Stores After Forecasting Wider Loss - Bloomberg



    Is "french fries" correct? Should it have been "French fries"?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    National modifiers are often lower-cased when they have no real connexion with the nation anymore: siamese twins aren't particularly Siamese, french windows and fries aren't particularly French.
     
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