French fries [in container]

  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I can't see the picture but if there is more than one piece of potato it is a picture of some (or "an order of" etc.) french fries.
    Edit: Re-loading I can see the image (my first response was based on the thread title of "French Fry" (not fries:)) I guessed close originally:) It looks like an order of fries. The piece of paper doesn't really have its own specific name.
     
    Last edited:

    jimanchower

    Member
    American English
    I would not call that a "cup," which to me implies that it's suitable for drinking liquid. That container is made of something like parchment paper. If I wanted to purchase what is pictured at a roadside stand I would say, "I'd like some fries" or "I'd like an order of fries," using "order" as a noun.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    It looks as though the fries in the first picture are covered with some sort of melted cheese. If that is true, I would call that a small bag/order of cheese fries.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Do you call this "chips"?
    No, they're crisps. We Brits invented the "sps" sound just to make life harder for non-natives (it puzzles a few of the local inhabitants as well :) )
    It looks as though the fries in the first picture are covered with some sort of melted cheese. If that is true, I would call that a small bag/order of cheese fries.
    Ah! Cheesy chips.

    Not so good them; they don't go so well with vinegar.
     

    homotopy07

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    British is chips versus crisps

    North America is fries versus chips
    Thanks.:) Hmm... maybe, I should call it "a packet of chips" or "a bowl of chips" in American English.
    a small bag/order of cheese fries.
    Thanks.:) By order, do you mean "something ordered (e.g., in a restaurant)"?
    No, they're crisps. We Brits invented the "sps" sound just to make life harder for non-natives (it puzzles a few of the local inhabitants as well :) )

    Ah! Cheesy chips.

    Not so good them; they don't go so well with vinegar.
    Thanks.:)
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Yes. You just say I want an order of chips and then they come in whatever that shop uses, envelope or bag or cup or paper box. The containers are varied. Each shop might have it's own name that they use behind the counter or to order from the supplier but there is no set word from the customers point of view.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    British is chips versus crisps

    North America is fries versus chips
    It's funny but in India and neighbouring countries, where British English terms are used much more than American ones (perhaps it's changing now), the word crisps has never been used. The usual word for crisps here is the American chips.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Is "French fries" commonly used in Indian English?
    It might be worth pointing out that "fries", often without the "French" and almost always without the "potatoes"* is common enough in Britain in burger bars, pubs and restaurants, where you would indeed just ask for "fries" or "a portion of fries" (or "chips" or "a portion of chips") and the container they come in is not important.

    However, in chip shops (takeaways, generally with no inside seating), not only is "chips" the only term to be used, there is also a distinction to be made between wanting your chips wrapped up and wanting them open, as shown in the picture. For the latter, I would ask for a bag of chips (or cheesy chips, in this case), irrespective of the type of container they come in, However, I have also seen "cone" used, where the container is a cone of paper. You can also just ask for "chips" or "a portion of chips" and then add "open" at the end (or in answer to the question "open or wrapped?"). However, the picture shows only about a half to two thirds the quantity I would expect from a British chip shop for a small bag.

    * "French fried potatoes" is the original term, with a quote in OED from 1856. The earliest quote for "French fries" is 1902. Curiously there is also the form "French frieds" with four quotes, one of them recent. Curiously "fries" on its own does not appear to have an entry in OED at all.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I was thinking of a roll of chips, but 'cone' is more appropriate, given the thing's shape. (which is actually a paper funnel :D )

    ... they don't go so well with vinegar.
    No chips ever do unless you mean to spoil them :D For me, too, both 'French fries' and 'potato crisps' are chips. I recognise and understand 'potato crisps' but I never use it... :)
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Just out of curiosity, what's the difference this makes?
    If you are taking them home to eat, e.g. as part of a family meal, you have them wrapped with extra paper (to keep them hot); if you intend to eat them as you walk you have them open.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    More or less everything has already been said here. I would just add that in my experience it’s most unlikely that a Brit would describe a single portion of chips/fries as an “order” (we’d only use that word to mean everything we’d ordered, e.g. if complaining that part of the order was missing).
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    More or less everything has already been said here. I would just add that in my experience it’s most unlikely that a Brit would describe a single portion of chips/fries as an “order” (we’d only use that word to mean everything we’d ordered, e.g. if complaining that part of the order was missing).
    :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

    You took the words right out of my mouth. I would order a "large order" or "small order" of fries. Or, "Do fries come with it?" (Almost always it is "Yes.")

    McDonald's only refers to the "box" in their websites as "compostable packaging".

    French Fries (Medium) Compostable Packaging
    French Fries (Medium) Compostable Packaging
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The chips in the photo in #32 are a meagre portion, perhaps just a garnish, served up in something that bears only a passing resemblance to the traditional scrap of old newspaper. How times change!
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I am amused by the horror expressed towards the size of this container by the BE speakers. Americans have a reputation for eating too much yet this seems like a perfectly adequate quantity to me if you want some fries with your meal.

    I wouldn't know what to call that particular container, though, except a serving container.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I am amused by the horror expressed towards the size of this container by the BE speakers. Americans have a reputation for eating too much yet this seems like a perfectly adequate quantity to me if you want some fries with your meal.

    I wouldn't know what to call that particular container, though, except a serving container.
    I think the cross section of those (seasoned) fries in #32 is significanty greater than those in #34, but that's just based on experience :)
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    I am amused by the horror expressed towards the size of this container by the BE speakers. Americans have a reputation for eating too much yet this seems like a perfectly adequate quantity to me if you want some fries with your meal.

    I wouldn't know what to call that particular container, though, except a serving container.
    In Canada I think that you get far more fries if you are in a fish and chip shop than you do if you get a small order of fries with your hamburger from a fast food place. Perhaps this reflects that a hamburger already has a sizeable bun? Not sure. But you can always supersize your fries at a fast food place!
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Yes, as has been pointed out before, despite the superficial resemblance, chips and fries are two different ideas and they are served in different ways to match the meals they were designed to accompany.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    The chips in the photo in #32 are a meagre portion, perhaps just a garnish, served up in something that bears only a passing resemblance to the traditional scrap of old newspaper. How times change!
    I'm pretty sure I've only ever seen cones of chips sold at (e.g.) funfairs / amusement parks in the UK ~ places where you're only going to be having them as a 'snack'; the portions are pretty meagre and (obviously) bear no relation whatever to the price :rolleyes:

    P.S. I didn't know there were fish and chip shops in Canada :)
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Oh yes! But they tend to be sit down cafes, not just stalls. Though I think the park concession stands still do fish and chips.

    And the best are near (former) fish docks or attached to fish shops. They are also on the menu of some casual restaurants. A few of the wonderful old ones have closed over the years especially as the fishing has declined, fish are more expensive, and maybe we are further away from British roots.
     
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