French kiss

Bonhomie

Member
Portuguese (Brazil)
Hi everybody,

which phrasal verb would better describe the following: You go clubbing and you meet someone for the first time, and give this person a French kiss (no touching, no nothing – only a French kiss).

make out x hook up

Thanks.
 
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  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    I certainly wouldn't use "hook up". I would assume that meant you had sex with the person if you used that term. "Make out" is usually a little more lengthy than one kiss, French or otherwise. :)
     

    Södertjej

    Senior Member
    Spanish ES/Swedish (utlandssvensk)
    What if it were only a Frech kiss? No sex.
    Just one kiss and then the person goes away? Correct me if I'm wrong but since this is not a very common thing I don't think there can be a special name for it. Except kiss and leave...

    Edit: xqby, you read my mind and replied while I was writing this post
     

    pickarooney

    Senior Member
    English (Ireland)
    I don't see any mention of it only happening once in Bonhomie's posts.
    There are dozens, if not hundreds of terms for it and the meanings and uses vary and overlap enormously.
     

    Bonhomie

    Member
    Portuguese (Brazil)
    There is a cultural problem here. Here in Brazil, this is not uncommon at all. Teenage boys and girls go clubbing, meet each other for the first time, and may or may not French kiss, chances are it’s going to be just a kiss – nothing more than that.
     
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    spatula

    Senior Member
    English - London (Irish ethnicity)
    Here in the UK people take great pleasure in 'snogging'. If you 'snogged' someone, this was a kiss and nothing more (and it would be accepted that this is likely to have been a Frenchie). You could 'snog' your partner, but it's more descriptive of a kiss with a new person. :)
     
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    Södertjej

    Senior Member
    Spanish ES/Swedish (utlandssvensk)
    But when you snog you kind of hug as well. I understood Bonhomie said it was just kissing, not touching each other at all, like deliberately keeping a distance between each other. That's what I find odd.
     

    spatula

    Senior Member
    English - London (Irish ethnicity)
    But when you snog you kind of hug as well. I understood Bonhomie said it was just kissing, not touching each other at all, like deliberately keeping a distance between each other. That's what I find odd.

    Perhaps Bonhomie could clarify this as I don't understand this to be his intention. The only kind of kissing that doesn't involve some form of embrace would be that of the Inuit nose type! I think he just means that it's a locking of lips but not necessarily of any other bodily parts. Hugging isn't sexual so is exempt. I stick by snogging.
     

    Bonhomie

    Member
    Portuguese (Brazil)
    Come on Södertjej ,
    of course there is touching, when I say “no touching” I mean fondling.
    Spatula you hit the nail on the head.
    Thanks.
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I think he just means that it's a locking of lips but not necessarily of any other bodily parts. Hugging isn't sexual so is exempt. I stick by snogging.
    That's how I understood Bonhomie's question, too:)

    I wonder what BrE "snogging" would be in AmE - "necking"?

    (I've never understood AmE "making out": it's always seemed to me to be highly ambiguous....)


    EDIT: Ah, I see Bonhomie's clarified while I was typing!
     

    spatula

    Senior Member
    English - London (Irish ethnicity)
    We have another expression in the UK; 'to get off with someone'. When someone tells you they 'got off with someone', it requires further detailed questioning to establish if this means just a snog or something more, as people tend to use it differently to describe various degrees of intimacy.

    The Australians are, I discovered, into 'pashing' instead of snogging, which I have to say I quite like. The word, that is. :eek:
     

    xqby

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    I wonder what BrE "snogging" would be in AmE - "necking"?

    "Necking" risks sounding comical; it's not used very often. I think that making out encompasses snogging--it certainly would for me in this context. The problem is that making out may involve slightly more lurid activities as well.
     

    Bilbon

    Member
    English
    I think 'pulled' would be a possible option, though it does have connotations of more than just a kiss in some contexts it is quite commonly used to refer this kind of thing.

    I think Spatula is right, 'get off with' works quite well but I don't really think 'snogging' is used that much, it depends on the age range of the target audience really.
     

    Bonhomie

    Member
    Portuguese (Brazil)
    Hi again,



    what do you think of "play tonsil hockey"? It sounds very American.
     
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    liss6565

    New Member
    English
    You would normally say either:

    "You go clubbing and you meet someone for the first time, and get with this person"
    Or
    "You go clubbing and you meet someone for the first time, and make out with this person"

    Both of them imply that it was literally just a french kiss and nothing else, the top one being slightly more collquial.
     

    spatula

    Senior Member
    English - London (Irish ethnicity)
    I think 'pulled' would be a possible option, though it does have connotations of more than just a kiss in some contexts it is quite commonly used to refer this kind of thing.

    I think Spatula is right, 'get off with' works quite well but I don't really think 'snogging' is used that much, it depends on the age range of the target audience really.

    You're right, pulled is another good one but, as you say, could mean more. Note the differences in our ages as to why I would say snog! Not that I go to clubs that often with that in mind..........
     

    spatula

    Senior Member
    English - London (Irish ethnicity)
    You would normally say either:

    "You go clubbing and you meet someone for the first time, and get with this person"

    I'm not familiar with this. Would you quite simply say, I got with a guy to mean kissed? What English do you speak, out of interest?
     

    Bilbon

    Member
    English
    Good point, it depends on the rest of the sentence, if it's made clear that you didn't go home afterwards "pulled" would work perfectly, if it's not then the ambiguity would cause a problem.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    You would normally say either:

    "You go clubbing and you meet someone for the first time, and get with this person"
    Or
    "You go clubbing and you meet someone for the first time, and make out with this person"

    Both of them imply that it was literally just a french kiss and nothing else, the top one being slightly more collquial.
    So "make out with" doesn't mean "have sex with", then? I must say, that's a great relief. I can now go back and read a number of apparently saucy AmE texts with a more innocent eye....

    By the way, when googling on this question, I found this wonderful site: How to Make Out for the First Time. I was particularly struck by the "Tips", including
    It's important to have good dental hygiene, so brush those teeth well beforehand
     

    Bilbon

    Member
    English
    'Make out' definitely doesn't mean 'to have sex with' I think you're out of the woods on that one.
     

    Bonhomie

    Member
    Portuguese (Brazil)
    ...and I'd go a little further. "Make out" seems to range from a simple kiss to something more passionate.
     
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    jdotjdot89

    Senior Member
    American English
    That's how I understood Bonhomie's question, too:)

    I wonder what BrE "snogging" would be in AmE - "necking"?

    (I've never understood AmE "making out": it's always seemed to me to be highly ambiguous....)


    EDIT: Ah, I see Bonhomie's clarified while I was typing!


    "Necking" hasn't been used in many decades. Most younger people now probably don't even know what it means, so I wouldn't use that.

    "Making out" means kissing--usually with tongue--and doesn't imply anything more than that.

    As for comments above, "hooking up" is NOT universally having sex across the whole United States. Where I'm from, it just means the same thing as "making out." I've run into awkward conversations with people from other parts of the country when someone says "hook up" and they think it means have sex and I think it means make out.
     
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    spatula

    Senior Member
    English - London (Irish ethnicity)
    Hi again,



    what do you think of "play tonsil hokey"? It sounds very American.

    To play tonsil hockey (note spelling) is heard in BE too. I don't think it's quite right for your context as it has slightly comic overtones. Cool young people who were snogging the face off other cool young people are unlikely to brag the next day about the number of people they 'played tonsil hockey' with the night before. Instead, co-workers at the office Xmas party are more likely to gossip about which of them partook in a game of tonsil hockey!
     
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    Bonhomie

    Member
    Portuguese (Brazil)
    Ok.
    So, one would brag about the number of people he or she made out with, right?
     
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    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    "make out" seems to be the best one after all.
    It looks like it, Bonhomie, if it's AmE you're after (which I imagine it is)!

    Panj, thank you for the link. It appears that my earlier interpretation of AmE "make out" was fifty years out of date. I'm even older than I thought:(

    So, one would brag about the number of people he or she made out with, right?
    Well, I certainly would.
     
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    Bilbon

    Member
    English
    To use Spatulas context, you could imagine a lot of cool young people standing around bragging about how many other cool young people they'd made out with the night before. So yes that would work.

    If you're after the BE version (i don't know if that's right, I'm new) rather than the AmE version it would be 'pulled last night' it has identical connotations but is more used in Britain I think.
     

    spatula

    Senior Member
    English - London (Irish ethnicity)
    To use Spatulas context, you could imagine a lot of cool young people standing around bragging about how many other cool young people they'd made out with the night before. So yes that would work.

    If you're after the BE version (i don't know if that's right, I'm new) rather than the AmE version it would be 'pulled last night' it has identical connotations but is more used in Britain I think.

    Sounds right to me Bilbon.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    This is easy!

    Necking really is more than one kiss.

    I suppose you could say making out, but I'd expect more than just one kiss with this one, too. Making out means you took some time to really get into it.

    My first choice would definitely be:

    "When he kissed me, he slipped me the tongue."

    There are variations on this, but this one's good.


    AngelEyes
     
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