French trend

rosingle

New Member
chinese
Hi folks,

I just read a Chinese newspaper talking about "french trend" in a phrase. I just googled this expression and only found one "rench Old Trend". Does it sound English to you or it's more appropriate to say "french trends"? Here is the context.

"Shanghai Daily" has recently elaborated a new section specialized in french trend. The topics vary greatly but some of the most popular ones are language, gastronomy and culture like films and music.

Tks in advance !
 
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  • rosingle

    New Member
    chinese
    Oh sorry.

    "Shanghai Daily" has recently elaborated a new section specialized in french trend. The topics vary greatly but some of the most popular ones are language, gastronomy and culture like films and music.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    "French trend(s)" sounds to me a bit of a strange way of describing that. :(

    Is that what the Shanghai Daily actually calls this new section?
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    "Shanghai Daily" has recently elaborated a new section specialized in french trend. The topics vary greatly but some of the most popular ones are language, gastronomy and culture like films and music.
    Is the section really about what people in France eat, what films French people are going to see, and how the French language is evolving? Those are "French trends."
     

    rosingle

    New Member
    chinese
    Is the section really about what people in France eat, what films French people are going to see, and how the French language is evolving? Those are "French trends."
    So the sentence
    "Shanghai Daily" has recently elaborated a new section specialized in French trends
    is correct given the info that I supplied ?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The word "elaborate" is wrong. The information says the section covers "language, gastronomy and culture like films and music" but it doesn't specifically say "French language, French gastronomy and French culture like films and music". It seems a little strange that a Chinese newspaper would devote a section solely to France so I still have doubts about "French trends."
     

    rosingle

    New Member
    chinese
    If I understand correctly the sentence "Shanghai Daily" has recently elaborated a new section specialized in French trends is correct given the information that I gave ?
    The word "elaborate" is wrong. The information says the section covers "language, gastronomy and culture like films and music" but it doesn't specifically say "French language, French gastronomy and French culture like films and music". It seems a little strange that a Chinese newspaper would devote a section solely to France so I still have doubts about "French trends."
    haha I agree it's bizarre. But French culture is indeed quite en vogue in China. And I've checked this section it talks only about France.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    The word "elaborate" is wrong.
    The word "elaborate" means take a short description and make it longer. You can only "elaborate" a thing that already exists. But you say this is "a new section", so you need to use a different word.

    The News created a new section in their newspaper, or added a new section to their newspaper.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The word "elaborate" means take a short description and make it longer. You can only "elaborate" a thing that already exists. But you say this is "a new section", so you need to use a different word.
    It really means to add more detail (which would make it longer as a consequence). It would be a very odd word choice even if they meant "to make the existing French trends section longer." ;)
     

    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    So "French trends" is supposed to mean "trends from France"?

    “Who’d have thunk it!” o_O(palm slaps forehead)

    So the expression is correct but not really idiomatic, sounding a bit stilted and (ironically!) old fashioned to my ears.

    I don’t think it’s been said already that “trends” means their topic is new developments in French culture, etc. So, I’d assume its not just generally about the richness of that country’s culture.
     

    Attachments

    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I seem to have mucked up my last post. I meant to tell you that I found a December 1954 article in my local newspaper that was headlined “French Trends”. (I tried to add an image of it but it doesn’t seem to have worked.) It is a very old fashioned article!
     

    lentulax

    Senior Member
    UK English
    'elaborated' - perhaps the vogue in China for all things French is so strong that the use of the English word 'elaborate' has been influenced by the meaning of the French verb 'élaborer' ?
     
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