Freshly graduated in journalism

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Monsieur Leland

Senior Member
French - France
Hello,

Can we say "Freshly graduated in journalism, John moves to town in order to blablabla".

Or should I say "A recent journalism graduate, John moves to town in order to blablabla"? (which is a more common formulation according to what I have heard. But I prefer the vibe of "freshly").
 
  • DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I don't personally think "freshly" works with "graduate", no. :(

    I'd stick to recent[ly], although newly might be a viable alternative.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I agree. It is possible to talk about a fresh graduate though (say, 'a fresh graduate with a degree in journalism').
     

    Monsieur Leland

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Thanks a lot for your explanations! So should I say:

    1) "Recently graduated in journalism, John moves to town in order to blablabla"

    or

    2) "A recent journalism graduate, John moves to town in order to blablabla"?"

    I have the feeling that the second option sounds more native, but from my perspective, it also distantiate us from the character. What sounds the best your your ears?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I can't comment without having context. What are you writing, a narrative or a potted biography? Is John alive or dead? Why is a participle phrase being used anyway? Admittedly I have a general dislike of them, preferring clauses with a finite verb stylistically, because the participle phrases are so 'distancing' as you neatly put it, and artificial or mechanical.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Thanks a lot for your explanations! So should I say:

    1) "Recently graduated in journalism, John moves to town in order to blablabla"

    or

    2) "A recent journalism graduate, John moves to town in order to blablabla"?"

    I have the feeling that the second option sounds more native, but from my perspective, it also distantiate us from the character. What sounds the best your your ears?
    The second option sounds better to me, but there's nothing really wrong with the first.
     
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