Freshman, sophomore, junior, senior

brenobrendan

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Freshman - A student in the 1st year of High School/College
Sophomore - A student in the 2nd year of High School/College
Junior - A student in the 3rd year of High School/College
Senior - A student in the 4th year of High School/College

What if it is a 5 or 6 year program? What do you call a student in the 5th or 6th year of college?
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Do you know of any 5 or 6 year undergraduate programs? (Medical training takes a while but has its own specific terms like intern and residency etc). Otherwise a student in 5th or 6th year at the undergarduate level would be called a "slow learner":D
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Do you know of any 5 or 6 year undergraduate programs? (Medical training takes a while but has its own specific terms like intern and residency etc). Otherwise a student in 5th or 6th year at the undergarduate level would be called a "slow learner":D
    I attended university part-time after military service and while supporting a family. No I didn't graduate in four years and I really resent being called a "slow learner."

    The University of Colorado based such designations as freshman, sophomore, etc. based upon number of semester-hours completed.
     
    Last edited:

    brenobrendan

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    Do you know of any 5 or 6 year undergraduate programs? (Medical training takes a while but has its own specific terms like intern and residency etc). Otherwise a student in 5th or 6th year at the undergarduate level would be called a "slow learner":D
    :D!!!
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Do you know of any 5 or 6 year undergraduate programs? (Medical training takes a while but has its own specific terms like intern and residency etc). Otherwise a full-time student in 5th or 6th year at the undergraduate level would be called a "slow learner":D
    Added the "assumed but not overtly stated until now" qualifier for the humour attempt :(
     

    waltern

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    What if it is a 5 or 6 year program?
    The (full-time) 5-6 year programs I'm aware of are generally accelerated ones which combine a bachelor's degree with a master's, MBA, JD, etc. - are those the sort of thing you are asking about?
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It's a fairly common practice among U.S. universities that (over)emphasize athletics to keep an athlete, especially a football (U.S. football, not soccer) player, on the sidelines during his freshman year when they already have enough good players at his position or when the university doesn't think he has the ability to graduate in four years while still playing a sport that demands a lot of time. He gets to practice with the team, he gets to grow a little and mature a little, he can accrue some academic credit, but he doesn't use up one of his four years of eligibility for intercollegiate athletics. This is known as red-shirting (hyphen optional) the athlete, from the practice of giving him a red shirt to wear during practice. In his fifth year at the institution (but his fourth and final year of intercollegiate athletics), he is known as a fifth-year senior.
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    It's definitely possible to be a college freshman, for example, for more than one year. Your status is based on credit hours, not years. Part-time students do this sort of thing all the time. There's really no mystery about it.

    The class designations become problematic when the student has enough credit hours move up a level but the credit hours aren't in the right courses for the degree he's working for. This might easily happen if the student changed majors, for example, or didn't take enough upper division credit hours. That's when you get "fifth-year seniors."
     
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