fret usage.

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Tae-Bbong-Ea

Senior Member
Korean
Hell all,

I have seen a sentence from newspaper.

"A handful of Republican senators, for instance, have fretted that more generous unemployment-insurance payments could create a mob of workers eager to be laid off."

But I am not sure of usage <fret>.

Because fret [intransitive] means worry. However, fret [transitive] means erode or corrode.
Meanwhile, as you may see the above sentence, i don't think usage <fret> in this sentence is transitive meaning.... Rather it look intransitive meaning.
But, "have fretted" is followed by that-clause which is an object as part of speech.

Hmm.. now I am confused.. what do I miss on this sentence?
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I find that use of fretted rather odd. But it does just mean that those senators are worried that that might happen / have expressed their concern that that might happen.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    That seems like normal use in American English to me. In this context it means they have publicly expressed that concern.

    A handful of Republican senators, for instance, have publicly stated their worry that more generous unemployment-insurance payments...
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I would be happier with the original if there were and "over" phrase following it.

    "A handful of Republican senators, for instance, have fretted over the thought that more generous unemployment-insurance payments could create a mob of workers eager to be laid off."
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    When a baby frets, it makes little whimpering sounds; its fretting is milder than crying.
    For me "fretting" means being burdened with uncertainty. I personally would not use it for a baby who I believe does not yet have that concept.
     
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