Friendly banter

Mola_mil_1

New Member
English- USA
I'm trying to translate the phrase "friendly banter" to Spanish. A friend of my (originally from Puerto Rico) suggested "dime y diretes". For me, "friendly banter" means light-hearted conversation between friends in which jokes and amusing remarks about each other (positive and negative) are used. Does "dime y diretes" have this meaning for a lot of Spanish speakers, or does it refer more specifically to just gossip between friends?
 
  • fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    Can you give us an example of the term "friendly banter" in a complete sentence, please? It's often easier to translate an idiomatic expression if we can see it used in a specific context.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'm trying to translate the phrase "friendly banter" to Spanish. A friend of my (originally from Puerto Rico) suggested "dime y diretes".
    I think it's dimes y diretes, but that translates to bickering, etc. I would translate friendly banter as una charla amistosa.
     

    Ferrol

    Senior Member
    Spanish.España
    I think it's dimes y diretes, but that translates to bickering, etc. I would translate friendly banter as una charla amistosa.
    Me parece "cháchara" más cercana a "banter" que "charla"
    "cháchara amistosa/amigable"
    A veces se pondría primero el adjetivo; ej "estaban los dos en amistosa cháchara"
     

    Mola_mil_1

    New Member
    English- USA
    Thank you all for your suggestions. I will be using the phrase as a topic header for the type of conversation that good friends can have amongst themselves, where they can use language that outside of those friends, might insult or offend (or be found to be 'flirty'). Cháchara probably captures this notion, but I'm not sure how widely it would be understood in this way. My sense is that Mexicans would not understand this, but I'm not certain about that. I'm worried with Cháchara that some might think of it as 'trash talk', and while banter can include trash talk, it can also include more positive exchanges that might even be considered flirty.
     

    gato radioso

    Senior Member
    spanish-spain
    As far as I know: dimes y diretes y closer to the idea of gossip, the type of talk so frequent in small towns about other people´s lives. I´ve seen it also applied to political controversies in the media -especially if they don´t are about important things-.

    E.g.:
    Estoy harto de vivir en este pueblo, donde todo el mundo se conoce y todo son dimes y diretes.

    Que el ministro conservador colabore frecuentemente en ese periódico de izquierdas ha causado muchos dimes y diretes entre la profesión periodística de la capital. Muchos lo consideran un engaño a sus votantes.
     

    Marsianitoh

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Spain
    In my opinión " banter" is more specific than " cháchara" or " charla", ( chatter/ smalltalk). Bantering implies exchanging teasing remarks.
    Maybe (in Spain) " estaban de vacile", " se estaban vacilando".
     

    gato radioso

    Senior Member
    spanish-spain
    I guess that "estar de" can help to convey that nuance, a situation in which people talk frankly and relaxedly about their personal issues, in a such particular way, that someone strange wouldn´t understand them well.

    Estar de cháchara
    Estar de charleta
    Estar cascando
    (cascar= to crack. This one is a metaphor, perhaps the idea is that the noise you make speaking that way is so cacophonous that it reminds of a machine or something cracking)
    Estar de cotilleo (this one is especific for gossip about other people)
    Estar dándole a la húmeda (=la húmeda is your tongue, this one is really coloquial)
    Estar de coña (in case of a jocular conversation)

    but I´m afraid these forms are too local, and might not be understood in American Spanish.
     

    jasminasul

    Senior Member
    Spanish Andalusia
    En España también tenemos cachondeo, muy parecido al vacile de Marsianitoh. Cháchara es simplemente hablar mucho, dale que dale, no es una simple conversación.
    Pero a mí no me queda claro de qué se trata, solo dices que es un título.
    Si quieres algo más preciso creo que tendría que ser algo como bromas y pullas (amistosas)
     

    Marsianitoh

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Spain
    En España también tenemos cachondeo, muy parecido al vacile de Marsianitoh. Cháchara es simplemente hablar mucho, dale que dale, no es una simple conversación.
    Pero a mí no me queda claro de qué se trata, solo dices que es un título.
    Si quieres algo más preciso creo que tendría que ser algo como bromas y pullas (amistosas)
    Pensé lo de "cachondeo", pero " estaban de cachondeo" me resultaba un poco ambiguo. A lo mejor "charlaban de cachondeo" o más propiamente " charlaban lanzándose pullas/ pullitas de cachondeo" pero claro, esto último es larguísimo...
     
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