'friends-making' website

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kiku_hana

Senior Member
Vietnamese
Hi all,

Here's my sentence - I wrote it as my diary:
May is my friend's name. I knew her from a social networking website.

< ---- >

By the way, is it ok if I say from a friends-making website so that the information is more specific?

Thank you

<< This discussion of a new topic has been split off from: knew or know? >>
 
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  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    from a friends-making website Is not idiomatic at all; friends-making is not used as an adjective. You could say, "from a website where people make [new] friends."
     

    kiku_hana

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    PaulQ: Thanks for your answer. I know friends-making is not an adjective in terms of a type of word, but its function can be used as an adjective, can't it?
     

    pwmeek

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Social network(ing) has become a set phrase for all the online sites such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, and many more. It means websites where the purpose is to interact with friends and share daily activities.

    If you made friends with someone on such a site, I would describe it as a social-networking site. This is understood, and as a set phrase, should not be modified.

    If you are trying to describe a computer-dating site (where strangers are matched by their interests) then you should call it just that: a computer dating service. It might be considered a form of social-networking, but the emphasis is on helping strangers to meet.

    "Friend-making site" is not a normally-used phrase, and would require an explanation every time you used it.
     

    kiku_hana

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    @ pwmeek: thanks for your explanation.

    In some books, I often see noun phrases, which the part standing before a noun can be in different forms of words: adjectives, v-ing, clause in order to clarify the meaning of such a noun phrase or the whole sentence. So, in stead of writing in a full sentence, I use friends-making site (a noun phrase) for that purpose.
    Is it not accepted?

    Thank you
     

    pwmeek

    Senior Member
    English - American
    "Friend-making" is certainly a grammatical way of constructing a phrase to describe a site which has the purpose of helping people make friends with each other. My point is that it is not used by AmE speakers (and I doubt whether it is used by BE speakers).

    There are the two similar phrases which are used for the two likely kinds of websites you may be describing. It would be better to decide which kind of website you mean, and use the appropriate phrase.

    If you insist on using your own made-up phrase, I would suggest that "friend-making" is better than "friends-making".
     
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