Fritter? Fried dough stick?

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
See the picture. It is part of breakfast for traditional Chinese people.
IMG_0358.JPG

What do you call it? Google translator in my iPhone tells me it is fritter, and Online search tells me it's fried dough stick.
 
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  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Never seen it before (so I don't yet call them anything:)) but wiki has this list of names

    Youtiao, also known as Chinese cruller,[1] Chinese fried churro, Chinese oil stick,[2] Chinese doughnutChinese breadstick, and fried breadstick, is a long golden-brown deep-fried strip of dough commonly eaten in China and (by a variety of other names) in other East and Southeast Asian cuisines.
    This site calls them fritters "You Tiao (Deep-fried Dough Fritters)"
    You Tiao (Deep-fried Dough Fritters)

    As with many food items popular in one culture, the names for them in other cultures often shows , ahem, variability.


    Cross-researched :)
     
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    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It's not a fritter, which, in my experience, are not that shape.
    Wikipedia offers:
    Youtiao, also known as Chinese cruller, Chinese fried churro, Chinese oil stick, Chinese doughnut Chinese breadstick, and fried breadstick, is a long golden-brown deep-fried strip of dough commonly eaten in China and in other East and Southeast Asian cuisines.
    There's no standardized English name that I know of. Anything understandable will probably work.
    [cross-posted]
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    I would call it a cruller. It's not shaped like a traditional cruller. Is it sweet or savory? Crullers are sweet.
    It's not a fritter; fritters have fillings such as vegetables or fruit.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    Thank you.

    I would call it a cruller. It's not shaped like a traditional cruller. Is it sweet or savory? Crullers are sweet.
    It's not a fritter; fritters have fillings such as vegetables or fruit.
    Just fried dough without savory, eaten with Chinese soy sauce.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    It's a well-known item here, and we generally just use some transliteration of the Chinese names, and the southern Chinese names are common where I am. This is noted in Wikipedia.
    Youtiao - Wikipedia
    In Malaysia and Singapore, it is known in English as you char kway, you char kuey, or u char kway, which are transliterations of its local Hokkien (Minnan) name (油炸粿 iû-chiā-kóe). It is rendered in Malay as cakoi, an alteration of the Minnan term, "char kuey".
    If I wanted to avoid saying 'you char kway', I might say (deep-)fried dough stick.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    We would call them churros. They are a fried dough stick, sometimes from choux pastry which is diffrent from doughnut dough, and traditional in Spain and Portugal. I only know about them because they featured in the Great British Bake Off show.

    Churro - Wikipedia
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    We would call them churros. They are a fried dough stick, sometimes from choux pastry which is diffrent from doughnut dough, and traditional in Spain and Portugal. I only know about them because they featured in the Great British Bake Off show.

    Churro - Wikipedia
    Yes! I couldn't remember the name. The only ones I've seen have sugar sprinkled on top, but maybe that's just an option.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    I would only use the Chinese name for this Chinese food. It is similar to a churro. It is also similar to a doughnut, except for the shape. I think of a "cruller" as a donut with stripes on it like a churro or a youtiao.

    These are all made by dropping shaped wheat batter into hot fat or oil, which cooks it.
    cruller.jpeg
     
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