Frizzy, fuzzy, curly

rogeb

Senior Member
Spain and Spanish
Hi everyone.

Speaking about the hair, I would like to know the difference among all these words:

Frizzy, fuzzy, curly

I refer to the meaning "<...>" in the Spanish language.
[Spanish deleted from English Only forum. DonnyB - moderator]

Thanks in advance.
 
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  • DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    We don't commonly use "fuzzy" when describing hair, although it might fit. Of the other two, "frizzy" generally refers to very tight curls.

    Have you got a full sentence you can let us have, please, and/or a picture showing the sort of thing you have in mind, so that we can give you a better answer?
     

    rogeb

    Senior Member
    Spain and Spanish
    Hi, thank you for your reply. Actually, I have no sentence in mind, I just wanted to know the difference among them. That way, I will leave out "fuzzy" for hair, and I will use "frizzy" when the hair is more curled, I mean with a curl becomes more tight, could this be right?.

    Thanks again.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "Frizziness" is generally not a desired quality. Don't compliment someone on their "frizzy hair" - they would rather you told them of a brilliant new product to get rid of the frizziness.

    Edit: Except perhaps for black people, whose hair is of a different texture anyway. I don't really know about that.
     
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    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I find that our dictionaries' definitions of "frizzy" are wrong to me (formed into small, tight curls, as hair). Frizzy hair is dry-looking, standing-up, sticking out, ...
    I have curly hair myself so I have some experience with "frizz."
    You'll notice that the frizzy hair is actually larger curls than the not-frizzy hair.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Frizzy hair is dry-looking, standing-up, sticking out, ...
    :thumbsup: and generally with loose wisps and hairs. It is usually negative and refers to the condition of the hair.
    Curly is neutral - in curls - it says nothing of the condition.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Plush (stuffed) toys are often described as "fuzzy". It refers to the fabric covering which has short, dense and generally soft and abundant fibers.

    Here is an example of a fuzzy bear:



    The real panda is one of the few living animals that I might be inclined to refer to as "fuzzy".

     

    rogeb

    Senior Member
    Spain and Spanish
    Thank you everyone for your contribution. I have clear the meaning and uses of these words now.
     

    S1m0n

    Senior Member
    English
    I wouldn't describe fuzz as curls. The essence of fuzziness, to me, is extreme shortness. Hair that is cut so short that it does not bend under its own weight is fuzzy. If you stroke it against the grain and you get a pleasing, tickling sensation on your fingers, you are stroking fuzz.
    Extremely short african hair is sometimes described as 'fuzz' (racially charged these days!), but I don't know where Cambridge is getting 'untidy'.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I agree it's not commonly used to describe hair, and I suspect that if you were to describe someone's hair as 'fuzzy' with no further context or description, we would not all interpret it in the same way.

    I'm not sure how I would interpret it.
     

    S1m0n

    Senior Member
    English
    70s America slang for police was 'the fuzz', because of their extremely short brush-cut hair-cuts, at least in comparison with long hippie hair.
     
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    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    You could not have known but I suspect Donny may be skirting the problem of "a fuzzy-wuzzy" - a now derogatory term that was an epithet applied to any black natives of primitive countries, particularly Pacific Islanders, as they were invariably drawn as have a large amount of (what we would now describe as) frizzy hair.

    33433

    The Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels selfless contribution to World War II - Maroochy RSL
    Throughout the Kokoda Campaign there was a group of dedicated Papuans who offered their man power and support to allied troops along the Owen Stanley ranges in 1942.

    The Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels, named for their frizzy hair and helpful role, became famous after Australian diggers wrote home describing their efforts along the muddy and treacherous terrain.
    Fuzzy now tends to mean (i) "out of focus" - "the picture was fuzzy and you could not see their faces clearly."
    or
    (ii) nebulous; lacking a clear form, taking approximations; "The facial recognition program works on fuzzy logic."
     
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