froggy boiling point

cornúpeta

Member
Spanish-spanish
Hi there!,

Anyone can help me with this phrase, given the context?:

"There are riots and protests in China (including cyberspace) as the downtrodden man in the street reaches his froggy boiling point".

As I've said so many times, I'm Spanish and I have a light idea of the meaning, though I can not say it in English, so another question I have for you is whether it is an idiom.

As ever, thanks in advance and be well:D!
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi cornúpeta

    No, it's not an idiom. It is, however, a reference to a widely-known (though seemingly untrue) anecdote - see this Wiki article:
    The boiling frog story is a widespread anecdote describing a frog slowly being boiled alive. The premise is that if a frog is placed in boiling water, it will jump out, but if it is placed in cold water that is slowly heated, it will not perceive the danger and will be cooked to death. The story is often used as a metaphor for the inability of people to react to significant changes that occur gradually.[1] According to contemporary biologists the premise of the story is not literally true; a frog submerged and gradually heated will jump out.[2][3]
    EDIT: Cross-posted with Tazzler, who is right - you should have given us the source for your quotation. I found the full version here, incidentally.
     
    Last edited:

    Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    There still is the question of what it means. In my opinion it means that the regular, oppressed man in the street has finally had enough.
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I think you slightly altered the excerpt. Here's the original:
    Not a day goes by that there aren't riots and protests somewhere in China (including cyberspace) as the downtrodden man in the street reaches his froggy boiling point.
    Boling point is reaching the extreme temperature at which the substance boils. His aggravation is so big (he reaches "the boling point") that he has to stand up to the ill-treatment of Government on the streets.
     

    cornúpeta

    Member
    Spanish-spanish
    You're right, dreamlike, I'v altered de excerpt, only not to be too long, and yes, you've given the complete context from Simon Black's newsletter

    Thanks everybody for your help, I find the expression much more clear now and I'd say I've got the apropriate meaning....

    honestly, what a reach language this of yours!!!

    regards!
     
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