(From) across the room, I watched him drinking coffee.

wanabee

Senior Member
Japanese
Dear all,

From across the room, I watched him drinking coffee.
Across the room, I watched him drinking coffee.

I made up the sentences.
Both seem to mean practically the same thing to me, but I'm not sure. Also I'm not certain if the second sentence is grammatical at all.
I would appreciate any comments.
 
  • compaqdrew

    Senior Member
    English - AE
    I am not sure if I would use the second one in a formal setting, but I have heard it. However, there is a difference in emphasis:

    From across the room, I watched him drinking coffee -- you are across the room from him
    Across the room, I watched him drinking coffee -- he is across the room from you

    The description of the scene is the same, but the emphasis is a little different. If you have been describing yourself, the first one seems to follow a little more easily. If you have been describing him, the second one seems to flow a little more.
     
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