(from) across

ironman2012

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

Thousands of law enforcement officers from across Colorado and around the country descended on Castle Rock Friday morning to honor the life of Douglas County sheriff’s deputy Zackari Parrish.

(This comes from thedenverchannel.com Officers from across the country take part in the funeral procession for DougCo Deputy Zack Parrish.)

1. Is a "from" omitted before "around"? That is, from across Colorado and from around the country.
2. Can I delete "from" without changing the meaning? That is, thousands of law enforcement officers across Colorado and around the country? I think "from" is unnecessary because I often see "people around the world...".

Thanks in advance!
 
  • ironman2012

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you.
    If I say "thousands of officers across Colorado descended on Castle Rock", is it right to say so? If it is right, does it mean another thing rather than mean "came from across Colorado"?

    In addition, is it right to say "people across Colorado like it"? Is "from" needed here?
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If I say "thousands of officers across Colorado descended on Castle Rock", is it right to say so?
    No, it's not. If these officers are spread across Colorado, they are in different places, so they can't all be at Castle Rock. The sentence needs "from": the officers went from different points in Colorado to Castle Rock.

    "People across Colorado like it" is fine. "From" is not needed because no movement is involved.
     
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