from aft to stern

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Johanna65

Senior Member
Sweden Swedish
Hi!

In the book I'm translating it says a person goes "aft to the cockpit", not in a boat but in a sort of military vehicle/tank. There is also the expression "from aft to stern", which I also get several hits for on Google. Doesn't aft and stern both refer to the tail end of something?

Thanks,

Johanna
 
  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    There is an equivalent expression "from stem to stern" meaning from the front to the back of a ship. The one you quote makes no sense. :)
     

    Scott AM

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    "Aft to the cockpit" could make sense. "Aft" can refer to a direction, meaning "towards the rear". If the cockpit was back from the front of the vehicle, you could conceivably go "aft, to the cockpit".

    As described by others, "from aft to stern" (from rear to rear?) makes less sense. But related to the above, a person could move "aft, to (the) stern".
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    "... from aft to stern"
    The only possible meaning of this is "... from the back end of the boat to the ship's helm". Helm is a possible synonym of "stern" and is either the handle of the rudder or the ship's wheel.

    However, without a sentence that includes the phrases, we are guessing.
     

    Scott AM

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    The only possible meaning of this is "... from the back end of the boat to the ship's helm". Helm is a possible synonym of "stern" and is either the handle of the rudder or the ship's wheel.
    That is a definition of helm, but it is not a synonym for stern. The helm can be found at the stern of a ship, but that's as close a relation as exists, I think.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    There is no possibility of "stern" meaning "steering gear" unless the text dates from the 17th century or earlier.

    Out of curiosity I did a Google search for the phrase "from aft to stern". I was astonished to find as many as just over 80 examples, but noted that Google reported "About 81 results (0.97 seconds)" - that makes a change from "About 669,000 results (1.16 seconds)". They are all nonsensical - like this one
    “Bravo team break up into two teams First team work your way from aft to stern” Bravo team two work your way from stern to Aft met in the middle.”
    Ultimate Weapon By Anthony DuPaul Phillips. The punctuation and grammar get worse. Other examples suggest that some people think "aft" means "stem". This from an eBay trader
    Overstock Boat Parts specializes in bringing you the best deals on boating supplies from Aft to Stern and Port to Starboard!
    Perhaps the Google hits for "aft to stern" result from confusion.
    Indeed. :thumbsup:
     

    Johanna65

    Senior Member
    Sweden Swedish
    "Aft to the cockpit" could make sense. "Aft" can refer to a direction, meaning "towards the rear". If the cockpit was back from the front of the vehicle, you could conceivably go "aft, to the cockpit".
    Yes, I have considered this possibility, but the cockpit is definitely at the very front of this vehicle.

    I will have to write to the author and ask him about this. Thanks everyone!
     
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