from next time/next time

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s21d

Senior Member
hindi
Could you tell me if we can use the word 'from' before next time. As in "If you don't follow my orders, I won't let you go from next time or just next time.
 
  • perpend

    Banned
    American English
    No, "from" doesn't sound natural to me there.

    Do you mean in the sense of "starting next time"?
     

    s21d

    Senior Member
    hindi
    No, I meant that someone won't receive permission for going on school trip next time if he/she doesn't follow the orders now.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I think we use "starting next time".

    If you don't follow my orders, I won't let you go starting next time.

    Or, simpler: ...., I won't let you go the next time.

    I guess you are right, this also works: ...., I won't let you go next time.
     
    Last edited:

    English nerd

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    And what about this one:

    You guys aren't sitting together from next time on in my class.

    Does it sound fine here? I mean we say "from next week on", so does it work here?
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    And what about this one:

    You guys aren't sitting together from next time on in my class.

    Does it sound fine here? I mean we say "from next week on", so does it work here?
    No, that doesn't work: you need an expression of some sort which marks the start of a period of time. You could have "from now on" or "from tomorrow on".
     

    English nerd

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    So with "next time" either "the" or "starting" are used , and with "from" time period is specified, right? I get it now. (Actually I asked this because my teachers use it all the time, but it always sounded a bit weird to me... So I asked it here)

    Thank you:)
     
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