from now/ a day on/ onwards

< Previous | Next >

tufguy

Senior Member
hindi
I would like to know about "from now/ a day on/ onwards". For example "I haven't gone out for a long time so yesterday I thought I would be going out from Monday on/ onwards."
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    When you say 'yesterday' what day was it? I mean yesterday really was a Monday. You wouldn't say from Monday onwards on Monday, you'd say 'from today onwards/today on/tomorrow on/onwards. We could use 'from now on'present, or 'from then on' if it's the past.
    I think you have the right idea, it's just a bit confused with the reported thought.
    "I've not been out much lately so yesterday I decided to go out every day from then on."
    "From now on, if you don't put your plate in the dishwasher, it will not be washed."
    "I'm getting up an hour earlier from Friday on(wards)."
     

    tufguy

    Senior Member
    hindi
    When you say 'yesterday' what day was it? I mean yesterday really was a Monday. You wouldn't say from Monday onwards on Monday, you'd say 'from today onwards/today on/tomorrow on/onwards. We could use 'from now on'present, or 'from then on' if it's the past.
    I think you have the right idea, it's just a bit confused with the reported thought.
    "I've not been out much lately so yesterday I decided to go out every day from then on."
    "From now on, if you don't put your plate in the dishwasher, it will not be washed."
    "I'm getting up an hour earlier from Friday on(wards)."
    So, are you saying "day name +on" is a wrong structure? But you used it in your last sentence. "I'm getting up an hour earlier from Friday on(wards).

    Are you saying I should have written "I haven't gone out for a long time so yesterday I thought I would be going out from then on/ onwards"?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I am not Hermione, but I found your use of 'yesterday' in the first part of your sentence confusing. I think that is what Hermione was saying.
    The second part of the sentence could be written 'from Friday on', as in Hermione's example.

    I suggest that you start a new thread to discuss the first part of the sentence: "I haven't gone out for a long time so yesterday ...."

    Explain what you want to say, using other words. You can ask about "haven't gone out" and whether it fits with the rest of the sentence.
    Or ask a different question, if there is something else you are unsure of.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top