from rising above the proverbial noise

Michael30000

Senior Member
Russian
Hello everyone,

From the book Stories That Stick by Kindra Hall.

A few years ago our team was approached by a founder who had a desire to tell his company’s story. They had everything you could want from a company: a passion for the work they do, a genuine commitment to creating excellent products and services, and as icing on the cake, they were frustrated that other companies in their space were beating them in sales and social equity with inferior products.
We were excited about this project for many reasons, but particularly because we suspected we were just one great founder story from rising above the proverbial noise. In highly saturated markets like this one, when everyone is pretty much saying the same thing, given time, a well-executed founder story can elevate a brand powerfully.

Does the bolded part mean that if Kindra's team succeeded with that project it would make her company/team more noticeable/prominent on the stirytelling market?

Thank you.
 
  • grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Does the bolded part mean that if Kindra's team succeeded with that project it would make her company/team more noticeable/prominent on the stirytelling market?
    Yes, except isn't she talking about the market that company (as opposed to Kindra's team) competed in? Does the context indicate there's a lot of competition in the storytelling market?
     

    Michael30000

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Yes, except isn't she talking about the market that company (as opposed to Kindra's team) competed in? Does the context indicate there's a lot of competition in the storytelling market?

    Well, she doesn't in this particular subchapter, but in one of the previous subchapters she directly says there's competition on the storytelling market.
    But the reason I think she means her team and not her client's company is this:

    "... because we suspected we were just one great founder story from rising above the proverbial noise."

    Who/what is "we" in that sentence? I think that, logically, "we" can only refer to Kindra's team.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I think she's talking about the company she's working with. When you work closely with another company, and the people there, ideally you form a team with the same end goal. Their success is your success and vice versa when providing a service.

    I work with people at different companies on computer things. I often say "we" and "our" when working with them.

    We [her company] were excited about this project for many reasons, but particularly because we [her company] suspected we [the team made up of her company and the client, and ultimately the client] were just one great founder story from rising above the proverbial noise. In highly saturated markets like this one, [the one the client is in] when everyone is pretty much saying the same thing [they complained that the competitors were actually inferior], given time, a well-executed founder story can elevate a brand [the client's brand] powerfully.​
    The well-executed founder story is intended to elevate her client, not her company. They aren't working on her founder's story and elevating her brand, but rather the brand of their underperforming client. "A few years ago our team was approached by a founder who had a desire to tell his company’s story." They have committed to the project and now she sees both companies as a team striving to achieve a goal.
     
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