... <from, since> 19th of May <till, to, until> 20th of June

deslenguada

Senior Member
Castellano
is there any difference whe saying "from/since" 19th of May "to/untill/till" 20th of June"

I think "since" is kind of old-fashionned, isn't it? at it seems to be as only be used with years "since 1889" , "till" with hours "till 6 p.m" I see "to" las the most appropaite of these three but "untill" doesn't sound bad if used with days" Please let me know whether I'm right or not. Thank you.
 
  • is there any difference whe saying "from/since" 19th of May "to/untill/till" 20th of June"

    I think "since" is kind of old-fashionned, isn't it? at it seems to be as only be used with years "since 1889" , "till" with hours "till 6 p.m" I see "to" las the most appropaite of these three but "untill" doesn't sound bad if used with days" Please let me know whether I'm right or not. Thank you.



    Hi Deslenguada,

    I would say "I shall be away from 19th May until 20th June"



    LRV
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    As a simple statement of dates relating to a period of time I would go along with la reine victoria. However, there are many other time expressions where you might want to use 'since', 'till' or 'until'.

    I've live here since 1981.
    I'll wait for you till six o'clock and no longer.
    Until/'til tomorrow!
     

    Hockey13

    Senior Member
    AmEnglish/German
    As a simple statement of dates relating to a period of time I would go along with la reine victoria. However, there are many other time expressions where you might want to use 'since', 'till' or 'until'.

    I've lived here since 1981.
    I'll wait for you till six o'clock and no longer.
    Until/'til tomorrow!

    I believe till is the shortened form of until. Til' could just be another way to say it, I suppose. In my opinion, you can always say either "until" or "till," but if you want to be less form and quicker, just say "till."
     

    EvilWillow

    Senior Member
    German (Germany)
    You can't combine since with to/until, and that has nothing to do with old-fashionedness or modernity.

    Since
    is followed by a point in time.

    - I have been waiting since 2 o'clock.
    I have been waiting all the time, starting at 2 o'clock, until you finally came.

    - I haven't been on holiday since August 2003.
    The last time I was on holiday was in August 2003. Until now, in 2006, I haven't been on holiday again.

    From ... to/until
    is used to specify a period of time.

    - I was in Greece from 20th August to 29th August.
    I might have been in Greece some other time since then.

    Note: until is written with one L only. Till or 'til is colloquial.
     

    RafaelX

    Senior Member
    Polish
    From ... to/until[/I] is used to specify a period of time.

    - I was in Greece from 20th August to 29th August.
    I might have been in Greece some other time since then.

    Note: until is written with one L only. Till or 'til is colloquial.

    From your post I infer that there is no real difference between to/until when we want to state the duration of something/period when it went or is going on, is that right?

    I mean, I have to say that I've also heard people using from followed by to or until in various contexts and I'm curious if there is any difference or not.

    Here: http://www.english-test.net/forum/ftopic50696.html somebody explains it as follows: "If you're dealing with time, the correct preposition is till. If it's for distance, then the correct preposition is to. So remember: time = till; location = to"

    Does such explanation make any sense to you? I don't buy it.
     
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