From that blessed little room, Don Quixote, Robinson Crusoe, came out, <a glorious host>, to keep~

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park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The narrator recalls his childhood, now about the only refuge from his distressing home schooling.
He lives with his mother, Peggotty the only maid of his house, his stern stepfather Mr. Murdstone, and Mr. Mudstone's eccentric elder sister in his late father's house.

....................
It was this. My father had left a small collection of books in a little room upstairs, to which I had access (for it adjoined my own), and which nobody else in our house ever troubled. From that blessed little room, Roderick Random, Peregrine Pickle, Humphrey Clinker, Tom Jones, the Vicar of Wakefield, Don Quixote, Gil Blas, and Robinson Crusoe, came out, a glorious host, to keep me company.
[David Copperfield by Charles Dickens]
I'd like to know if "a glorious hose" is in apposition to "Roderick Random, Peregrine Pickle, Humphrey Clinker, Tom Jones, the Vicar of Wakefield, Don Quixote, Gil Blas, and Robinson Crusoe"
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I'm very confident it is in apposition.

    The WR dictionary says of that meaning of host:
    1. [ usually: ~ + of] a great number of persons or things;
      multitude:a host of details.
    2. an army.
    I feel it has more the sense of an army here. A literary army.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    We perhaps should say that we usually encounter this meaning 2. in the expression 'the heavenly host', which doesn't mean someone who gives his guests caviar and champagne but a spiritual army of angels and saints.

    PSJ, you should correct that mention of 'a glorious hose'; it made me laugh.
     
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