from the In Auction

joel123

Senior Member
persian
Does "form the In Auction" refer to smuggling or does it refer to "item"?
I mean, does the item belonged to In Auction or does the author is talking about smuggling them {the children} from the In Auction?
I am a little confused:confused:.

Olaf smuggled us away in that item from the In Auction with the help of Esmé Squalor,” Duncan began, referring to the last time the Baudelaires had seen him and his sister.


"The Vile Village," by Daniel Handler
 
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  • joel123

    Senior Member
    persian
    What is that item? A large trunk or piece of furniture in which someone could hide? Or isn't a person saying this?
    the item was a large statue. in the previous story, Count Olaf (who is the bad guy) hid the children inside that statue.
     

    abluter

    Senior Member
    British English
    "In Auction" sounds like a category in a shop or auction house, like, for instance, "Unpaid For" or "Next Sale". But I'm guessing.
     

    joel123

    Senior Member
    persian
    "In Auction" sounds like a category in a shop or auction house, like, for instance, "Unpaid For" or "Next Sale". But I'm guessing.
    I am sorry that I did not explain earlier, but In Auction was an Auction of things/items that were fashionable/trendy.
     

    abluter

    Senior Member
    British English
    I don't really understand how Olaf could have smuggled anyone away in an item from the "In" Auction, unless it was a very large tea chest and there were no more than two people being smuggled away.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hi joel123

    You're asking, I think, whether your sentence divides as:
    (a) Olaf smuggled us away in [that item from the In Auction]
    or
    (b) Olaf smuggled us away [in that item] [from the In Auction] = Olaf smuggled us away [from the In Auction] [in that item].

    The first answer, of course, is that it could be either. But (b) would only be more likely if someone had just referred to the item, and from a very quick look at the context, it doesn't look as though anyone has. So I'd probably plump for (a) - though I might be wrong:cool:.
     

    joel123

    Senior Member
    persian
    Hi joel123

    You're asking, I think, whether your sentence divides as:

    (a) Olaf smuggled us away in [that item from the In Auction]
    or
    (b) Olaf smuggled us away [in that item] [from the In Auction] = Olaf smuggled us away [from the In Auction] [in that item].

    The first answer, of course, is that it could be either. But (b) would only be more likely if someone had just referred to the item, and from a very quick look at the context, it doesn't look as though anyone has. So I'd probably plump for (a) - though I might be wrong:cool:.
    Thank you so much. :thank you: :)
     
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