from the United States and around the world

  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It is a typical usage for this sort of thing. The Library of Congress is in the United States, so in one statement they're confirming that they have works from the United States, as you would expect, and also from around the world, so it's not just a national collection.
     

    westwind

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Can I say "the Chinese History Museum attracts tourists form China, japan, Russian and all over the world?"
     

    westwind

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    How about this "the Chinese History Museum attracts tourists form China and all over the world?"
    I am little confused. Since the US can be used with "the around the world," why
    can't "China, japan? "
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    How about this "the Chinese History Museum attracts tourists from China and all over the world?"
    'All over the world' is a bit too strong in that sentence. It is understandable, but not the best.

    'The Chinese History Museum attracts tourists from China and around the world.' :tick:

    'The Chinese History Museum attracts tourists from all over the world.' :tick:
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I agree with the distinction:
    all over the world means (to me) from all parts of the world.
    around the word means (to me) many places around the world.

    To further clarify my original comment, I like only one location coming before "and around the world" -- not two or more locations. And I really wouldn't use this construction much myself, even with just one location before the phrase. So while I can make a case for using it, I can't really recommend using it, if that makes sense. :)
     

    westwind

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you, copyright.
    Thnak you, Wandle.
    Sorry not to make my question clear. I thought "all over the world" is synonymous with "around the world", so I used them interchangeably. My question is--Can I say "the Chinese History Museum attracts tourists form China, japan, Russian and around the world?" In other words, can more than one country appear before "and around the world?"
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    As I mentioned, I'm not a fan of that, but I suppose you can if you want to bring particular attention to those three countries because the bulk of your visitors come from there — and yet you still want to say that you get international visitors.

    It's Russia, by the way. Russian is an adjective.
     
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