from where

cordeliaeugenia

Senior Member
English
Could this ever work in a legitimate sentence?

In 2004 I graduated from high school with excellent results and enrolled in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of XY from where I obtained my BA in Czech language and literature and French language and literature in 2008.


What would be the ''normal'' way of saying these facts?

Thank you in advance.
Cheers!
 
  • HalloweenHJB

    Senior Member
    American English, Midwest USA
    Could this ever work in a legitimate sentence?

    In 2004 I graduated from high school with excellent marks or grades and enrolled in the School or College of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of XY where I obtained my BA in 2008[/COLOR] in Czech language and literature and French language and literature.


    What would be the ''normal'' way of saying these facts?

    Thank you in advance.
    Cheers!
    I would consider the corrections in dark red. That sounds more natural in American English and would be best understood in an American university setting. The British English members may have other suggestions based on the educational system in Europe.
     
    Last edited:

    cordeliaeugenia

    Senior Member
    English
    Thank you all :)

    For HalloweenHJB: Wouldn't it be tricky to separate ''BA'' and ''Czech etc.''? I've always been told not to ''separate'' in situations like that:confused:
    Could I put it like this:

    ...enrolled in the School or College of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of XY where, in 2008, I obtained my BA in Czech language and literature and French language and literature.

    Thanks;)
     

    Grumpy Old Man

    Senior Member
    In 2004 I graduated from high school with excellent results and enrolled in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of XY from where I obtained my BA in Czech language and literature and French language and literature in 2008.
    As you have noticed, there seem to be quite a few "normal" ways of saying things!:) I don't want to object to anything that has been said so far, I would just like to mention that in my experience the subjects you would be studying at university level in Europe would probably be called Czech Philology [and Literature] and French Philology [and Literature]. In Finnish universities "French Philology" would automatically entail delving into French literature and literary history, which is why I have placed "and Literature" in brackets.

    Since you mention the name of the university (the University of XY), the relative clause that follows it is nonrestrictive and consequently in traditional grammar anyway, a comma is needed: ... at the University of XY, where/from which I obtained...

    I see no need to set off in 2008 with commas even if is placed earlier in the sentence.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Absolutely right :)
    However, I tend to avoid using the word philology because I've found out it's not readily understood by everyone.
    You are very wise.
    There are no UK university courses with "philology" in their formal title.
    (I searched on the central university admissions website HERE.)
     

    WordRef1

    Senior Member
    English - America
    I don't know what the heck philology means, but then I never went to college either.

    In my first reading I thought, definitely put a comma after the "University of XY". However, I also thought that you had previously received a degree from that university before enrolling there (saying you joined the Faculty significantly supported that misunderstanding. It sounded like you were getting a job.). So, to help I'd say definitely do not put the "from which" or "from where", but just "where" (in which case I don't particularly need a comma after the XY to understand more easily).
     

    cordeliaeugenia

    Senior Member
    English
    Hello, everybody! Thank you all for answering :)

    Grumpy Old Man, you're right about philology, but in Croatia 'Language and Literature' is the official name referring to the whole major, comprising all the aspects of the language learning program. I understand it may sound strange to you or anyone else, but I think the reason these administrative terms are translated so is to make distinction between the terms used in the UK and other European countries. For example, HalloweenHJP (USA) suggested I replace 'Faculty' with 'School' or 'College', but the fact is that faculty is what it's called in Croatia (Cro=fakultet). But nevertheless, thank you all for suggesting all these changes, I've learned a few things now :D
    I usually use the term 'philology' when filling in additional info slots or if asked to specify the kind of stuff I'm studying.

    All the terms I used, I used with the aim of sounding European, eg. 'results' for 'marks or grades' ('cause I wasn't sure if it would sound OK). Do you still think 'marks' or 'grades' are better way to go?

    WordRef1, yep, you're right! I got my BA and now I'm toiling to get my MA degree. This is supposed to be an attempt at writing a CV.
    However, I've decided on using just 'where'. Thanks all for enlightening me ;)


    Cheers!
     

    Pripyat

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Hi!
    May I ask you to help me again?

    They reached the same hospital room where they had been sent to the bathhouse from.

    I mean, earlier, they had been sent from the hospital room to the bathhouse. Now they returned to that hospital room again.
    I think this sentence is too complicated, isn't it? I am confident it's better to put from before where. What do you think about it? I doubt cause I know it's not the best was to say "From where are you?" instead of "Where are you from?". Is it possible not to follow this rule in my case?
     

    Grumpy Old Man

    Senior Member
    I don't speak Russian but I assume that there are relative clauses in Russian? That should guide you. Use a relative pronoun instead of where: They reached the same hospital room from which they had been sent to the bathhouse. The sentence is grammatical but I cannot guarantee it sounds perfect to native ears. Hopefully you'll get replies from other members.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top