from which the poems from Sailing to Byzantium through

Discussion in 'English Only' started by sb70012, Jul 20, 2013.

  1. sb70012

    sb70012 Senior Member

    Azerbaijani
    The tower (1928) and The Winding Stair (1933), from which the poems from Sailing to Byzantium through After Long Silence have been here selected, represent the mature Yeats at his very best-a realist-symbolist-Metaphysical poet with an uncanny power over words. These volumes represent his fourth and greatest period.

    Source: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, William Butler Yeats (1865-1939)

    Hello teachers,

    I know the meanings word by word but I can’t get the total meaning of the brown written part.

    I can’t understand whether the text means:

    The tower (1928) and The Winding Stair (1933), were selected from Sailing to Byzantium.
    The tower (1928) and The Winding Stair (1933), were selected from Sailing to Byzantium and After Long Silence.
    Sailing to Byzantium and After Long Silence were selected from The tower (1928) and The Winding Stair (1933).
    Or …..

    I think it’s written with old and complicated grammar. What does the brown written part mean exactly?
    The words (from) and (through) in the first line makes me get mixed up and can’t understand the whole sentence.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. morior_invictus

    morior_invictus Senior Member

    Slovak
    The poems (from Sailing to Byzantium to and including After Long Silence) from The tower (1928)* and The Winding Stair (1933)* have been selected here [The Norton Anthology of English Literature, William Butler Yeats]

    * the books of poems
     
  3. sb70012

    sb70012 Senior Member

    Azerbaijani
  4. morior_invictus

    morior_invictus Senior Member

    Slovak
    Nice picture. :) So it seems that you still don't understand it. So,...
    "from which the poems from Sailing to Byzantium through After Long Silence have been here selected" is an additional information for a reader.
    There have been more poems than Sailing to Byzantium and After Long Silence selected. Thus there is written "from X through Y" and not "X and Y."

    And please, don't say "Thank you." unless you really comprehend it.
    Source : idiomsandexpressions.com
     
  5. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London but from Yorkshire
    English - England
    The grammar may be a bit complicated but it is not old. The author is explaining which of Yeats's poems have been chosen for his anthology. The Tower and The Winding Stair are earlier published collections of poems. The author's anthology includes a section beginning with the poem Sailing to Byzantium and ending with the poem After Long Silence. The poems in this section were previously published in The Tower and The Winding Stair.
     
  6. sb70012

    sb70012 Senior Member

    Azerbaijani
    Hello again my friends,

    You did best but inspite of that it's hard to me to paraphrase it correctly. After reading your comments and the text I have posted, I paraphrase the text like this:

    The author says, there is a collection of poems. The first poem is "Sailing to Byzantium" and the last
    poem is "After Long Silebce". Between these two poems there are two poems "The Tower" and "The Winding Stair"
    which are selected to represent the mature Yeats.

    Is my paraphrase correct?
     
  7. velisarius

    velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    The editor of the anthology has selected poems from The Tower and The Winding Stair.
    The first of the series of poems selected and printed in the anthology is Sailing to Byzantium and the last is After Long Silence.

    "From A through Z" is an American expression, meaning "beginning with A, ending with Z, and including all those in between."
     
  8. sb70012

    sb70012 Senior Member

    Azerbaijani
    Now I got it. Thanks a million everybody.

    Thank you Morior.
    Thank you Teddy.
    Thank you Velisarius.
     

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