frost nip?

HSS

Senior Member
Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
frost nip

This is what I thought of as close to the condition that I'm trying to name as possible. But I'm still not comfortable with it.

A tingling, itchy, sometimes burning, sensation on a finger or any extremity due to poor blood circulation resulting from too much exposure to cold temperatures. The skin has become pink to red. It's not so bad as in frostbite or a chilblain. It's sometimes puffy, but it's not to the point where medical attention is called for. It's just itchy. It gets more so when your body warms up, such as when you have turned into bed for sleep at night. Maybe, minor frostbite?

A: Look at my fingers. It's itchy, and hot. You know, I have bad circulation, so I get this every winter.
B: Same here. My frost nip is on my ears this year.

Any and all enlightenment would be highly appreciated.

Hiro
 
  • papakapp

    Senior Member
    English - NW US
    We would say "my fingers are frozen" or "My ears are frozen".

    I suppose hypothermic digitals or hypothermic auricles would be the precise term you are looking for. But I would not expect to actually encounter that outside of a clinical report.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I don't believe we have a general term for this -- which is, in some ways, surprising, since most of us have experienced the sensation you're talking about. I think we just describe it, as papakapp suggests: My ears are frozen -- but that pins-and-needles sensation when they warm up is even worse.
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    If you heard 'My ears are frozen,' would you expect the speaker's ears were at least itchy?

    Is frost nip too strong?
     

    papakapp

    Senior Member
    English - NW US
    If you heard 'My ears are frozen,' would you expect the speaker's ears were at least itchy?

    Is frost nip too strong?
    "Frost nip" is exactly what you are describing. But it is not a universally used term. I think everybody would understand it. But not everybody would use it. I live in the Pacific Northwestern United States and I cannot recall hearing it spoken even once. But I have seen it in print enough times to know what it means.

    And yes, "My ears are frozen" would imply frost nip.
     
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    papakapp

    Senior Member
    English - NW US
    Could you use a metaphor?

    "My ears have an ice cream headache."

    "My fingers have brain freeze."

    :confused:

    "I am experiencing distal angina occasioned by hypothermic vasoconstriction."

    Take your pick :D they mean the same thing.
     
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    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    A: Look at my fingers. It's itchy, and hot. You know, I have bad circulation, so I get this every winter.
    B: Same here. My frost nip is on my ears this year.


    I think I would say this:
    A) Look at my fingers. They are itchy and irritated. You know, I have bad circulation, so I get this every winter.
    B) Same here. I have my frosty nip on my ears this year.

    It's not the best use of frosty, but it may help you. "frost" by itself sounds odd.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The trouble with using frost nip is that it is not a common expression. The OED has it as archaic and identical in meaning to frostbite (which I find interesting, as when I was being taught survival medicine frost nip was described as the precursor to frostbite). Your suggested conversation sounds odd to my ears, as I would expect something like "my ears are frozen this year". However, your use of frost nip could be correct if you meant that you had been so cold that ice crystals were beginning to form in unprotected parts of your external ears. I would not use frosty nip as that is not a normal usage - it sounds more like an ice lolly than a condition which if untreated would lead to tissue destruction.

    PS

    Your definition is dubious, where did it come from? The essential requirement for frost nip is that ice crystals have formed in the tissues, but have not yet formed sufficiently to cause tissue destruction - which makes the condition frostbite.
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    ...
    PS

    Your definition is dubious, where did it come from? The essential requirement for frost nip is that ice crystals have formed in the tissues, but have not yet formed sufficiently to cause tissue destruction - which makes the condition frostbite.
    frost nip

    This is what I thought of as close to the condition that I'm trying to name as possible. But I'm still not comfortable with it.

    A tingling, itchy, sometimes burning, sensation on a finger or any extremity due to poor blood circulation resulting from too much exposure to cold temperatures. The skin has become pink to red. It's not so bad as in frostbite or a chilblain. It's sometimes puffy, but it's not to the point where medical attention is called for. It's just itchy. It gets more so when your body warms up, such as when you have turned into bed for sleep at night. Maybe, minor frostbite?

    ...
    My description above is what I was trying to get a name for; that's not the definition for a frost nip. By the sound of your description, frost nips are a lot worse.

    No, because they don't get itchy until they start to warm up.

    No, it's too weird. :)
    So you can't use 'frozen' when they are warm ... This condition is rather after (and while) they are frozen .... It's a prolonged stage with reddish skin and itchiness. It may stay like that for the rest of the winter.

    ...

    A: Look at my fingers. It's itchy, and hot. You know, I have bad circulation, so I get this every winter.
    B: Same here. My frost nip is on my ears this year.

    ...
    Ooops, 'It's' should have been 'They're.':) So frost nip is not usually used, I see.
     
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    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I've never heard the term and would have little idea what it meant much less that it was something so specific. I can't really say I'm familiar with the experience either.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello HSS :)
    I am not sure why you reject 'chilblains'. I know that the term is not so familiar these days even though it is the common or ''vulgar" term, not the Latin or Greek derived medical one. In my pre- historic pre-central heating, pre- plastic and pre- nylon youth, chilblains on the toes were common in winter. We would play outside for hours in the snow, then stick our ''frozen" feet in front of the gas or coal fire. The poor contracted veins suddenly have to expand in what is a normal reaction to heat, but abnormally provoked. Blood can seep through the veins. Itching is a signal that something is wrong: it's a close relative to pain.

    People who live in very cold climates do not normally experience chilblains because they have various adaptations that mean they do not normally experience extremes of heat or cold. I don't know how many younger people in the UK know what chilblains are.

    I have never heard the term 'frostnip' as opposed to 'frostbite'. If we are talking about past participles then 'frostnipped' when talking about crops would be fine. If somebody said to me that their ears were frost-nipped I would understand that they meant affected by frost somehow. Probably I would then ask what they meant, they would say a bit itchy, swollen and sore, and I would say " Oh you mean like " chilblains"".

    I don't know what your context or audience is.

    Hermione
     
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    mr cat

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would say 'my fingers / ears are suffering from the cold, even, as you say, a few days after the exposure.
    B: Same here. My ears are suffering this year.
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Hello HSS :)
    I am not sure why you reject 'chilblains'.
    No, I don't reject it, HG:) It's just that I was looking for a term that would easily tell others the condition (in Post 1) in everyday conversation. The way dictionaries define it, a chilblain would be too severe a case; maybe, a 'minor chilblain' would better fit my description?

    Or, better yet again,

    "My ears are itchy and red from cold"

    could fit it too, couldn't it?
     

    mr cat

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Personally I wouldn't use the word 'itchy' to describe that sensation, tingling (or even tingly) would be my preference; My ears are (still) red and tingling from the cold.
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    ... My ears are (still) red and tingling from the cold.
    A small question, Cat. You certainly would just say 'from cold' instead of 'from the cold' if you didn't refer to a mutually understood cold weather, wouldn't you? (In this,yes, you wouldn't add 'still')
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    My ears are (still) red and tingling from the cold. requires the the; it is only rarely omitted.

    BE A finger (or other extremity) that has gone white through cold is said to have gone dead (informal)

    The pain on the return of feeling is known as "[the] hot-aches" (informal) which can be genuinely painful.

    I have never understood the idea of, or experienced, "itching or tingling" as the feeling comes back, and I suspect that Hermione's chilblains are the answer to that
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    My ears are (still) red and tingling from the cold. requires the the; it is only rarely omitted.
    Does this mean you can rarely use 'from cold,' with which you introduce a cold weather [new information]?

    Joe: Hi, Jane.
    Jane: Hello, Joe.
    Joe: I just came back from South Africa. My ears are red and tingling from the cold.
    Jane: What cold? What season is South Africa in now?
    (Here, in order to avoid Jane's query, wouldn't it be better to just say 'from cold'?
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Ah, 'the cold' here does not have to be a specific 'cold.' Doesn't it? It represents generic cold weathers, as in B), doesn't it? In B) 'the cold' would normally be any cold environment, right?

    A) My ears are red and tingling from the cold.

    B) Pam and I would often play in the cold.
     

    vhai

    New Member
    English - USA
    Ah, 'the cold' here does not have to be a specific 'cold.' Doesn't it? It represents generic cold weathers, as in B), doesn't it? In B) 'the cold' would normally be any cold environment, right?

    A) My ears are red and tingling from the cold.

    B) Pam and I would often play in the cold.
    I know your question is from years ago, but yes, you have to have "the", in front of cold, because it is odd to see "from cold" without a verb, like, "from BEING cold". We treat "cold" as either a state of being, or, if you use it as a 'noun', you generally refer to the 'cold weather'/cold environment. So everyone will know when you say 'the cold' you mean either, 'the cold weather', or 'the cold environment', by context. (Because otherwise you might mean, I "have a" cold, meaning, I am sick, versus, I "am" cold, which is, I feel cold.)

    As to your original question: There is no general, everyday term that people will know! The reason I found this is because I wanted to look up what I also have. And it is definitely itchy, not just tingly (because I have experienced both)! So basically you have to describe it, and then educate people on the term 'chilblain' or 'frostnip', whichever you prefer. Sorry, no easy term people easily recognize in everyday conversation. Most people are aware of 'frostbite', and if you say, mild frostbite, your point may also be made, but no one will understand the nuances of the condition (it is itchy!).
     
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