Fuckable, -able

涼宮

Senior Member
Sbaeneg/Castellano (Venezuela)
Good afternoon!

I was told that the usual suffixes to express the morpheme -able are -alny/-elny. Are there any rules, phonological rules, about when to use -alny or -elny? Do you use a noun, the verb's stem or something?, I am mainly interested in what usually natives speakers do to make up a word that isn't in the dictionary even if it is common at an informal level; like the one I put as a title.

If I wanted to say ''fapable/fuckable'', both informal/vulgar, how would you express them?

I found 'fuck' as jebać, pierdolić and ruchać. I don't know which one to use and how to turn it into 'fuckable''.


Thank you in advance! :)
 
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  • LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    I don't know if you realize, Suzumiya, but it sounds extremely vulgar, much more vulgar, I would say at least ten times more vulgar (just an approximation, nothing precise) in Polish than in English, since the English word has lost most of its associative power. The Polish one did not lose that much. Educated, decent people and even punks don't talk like that. Maybe the guy that drinks by the fence all day long would use it if he is extremely nasty in addition to all of that.
     

    涼宮

    Senior Member
    Sbaeneg/Castellano (Venezuela)
    But dear Liliana, you have knowledge of several languages, and you are translator, right?, then, I think you already know that there aren't bad nor good words when they are being discussed and seen from a linguistic point of view. It's like a doctor, if you are afraid of blood how can you be a doctor? if you think X person is gross/nasty and because of that you won't help her/him, can you be a doctor?, a surgeon cannot feel any nastiness when doing a surgery, the same thing happens with words, in my opinion. I'm not asking about vulgar words to use them, but they are part of the language and thus must be learnt. No one will learn a language without knowing swear words and not being able to understand them. :D
     

    El Torero

    Member
    Polish/Poland
    be that as it may, i can't seem to think of any good translation of "fuckable" into Polish. The suffixes you mentioned as well as others (-śny, -tny) just don't fit. A short, one-word translation which would conserve the level of expression...? no idea.
     

    涼宮

    Senior Member
    Sbaeneg/Castellano (Venezuela)
    But, what about making up one? That is my main question, about what usually Polish people do to make up a word for expressing -able. Do you use the verb's stem? Even if it is not grammatically correct, but rather understandable and accepted at a colloquial level.
     
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    El Torero

    Member
    Polish/Poland
    i guess we do use the verb in some way, though i suppose it would take a teacher to explain this, how about i give you some examples and you can draw your own conclusions? The thing is that Polish is full of exceptions and no matter how many examples I give you, something will be left out :\
    jeść (eat) - jadalny (edible)
    czytać (read) - czytelny (legible)
    zmywać (wash) - zmywalny (washable)
    przenosić (carry, transport) - przenośny (portable)
    pić (drink) - pitny (drinkable)
    palić [się] (inflame, light up) - palny (inflammable)
    odwracać (reverse) - odwracalny (reversable)
    osiągać (achieve) - osiągalny (achievable)
    However, it does not work with any verb. "Fuckable" which would be "ruchalny"(?) sounds completely wrong, no one would use it but I suppose it could be understood

    Hope it helps and let's wait for more Poles to show up
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    Yes, definitely, you have the right to know the forms, just, I would not advise using them. In this case, however, I am afraid such a form does not exist and it is not worth inventing.
     
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    BezierCurve

    Senior Member
    But, what about making up one? That is my main question, about what usually Polish people do to make up a word for expressing -able. Do you use the verb's stem? Even if it is not grammatically correct, but rather understandable and accepted at a colloquial level.
    If I had to, I'd go for "jebalny", this should be easy enough to understand the intention. "Ruchalny" could possibly work as well.

    As for a phonological rule (-elny / -alny), I'd risk to say there's none and that the much less frequent -elny should be treated as a randomly occurring irregularity. Most of the adjectives ending with -elny bear no meaning of -able.
     

    dopethrone

    New Member
    Polish
    Fuckable - ruchałbym (or jebałbym). It literally means 'I would fuck her' but it works quite well. Another options: ruchable (ruchać + able); ruchalna. From my experience, these words are pretty common in some specific hip hop communities.

    Bonus - Quote from hip hop song Jeansy by Lilu:

    "Ale jest małe ups, kiedy widzę twój tyłek
    ta naga pupa pozdrawia przechodniów i rynek
    Oprócz tego, że jest fajna, mówi, że jesteś ruchalna"
     

    kknd

    Senior Member
    polski / Polish
    polish seems to be not so much regular as english (were you can affix -able to most of verbs…); speaking of fuck only analytic forms will do in translation (to be strictly correct): "dający się + infinitve" should be it. nevertheless in most cases such translation looks awkward and calque…
     

    Foxxionly

    New Member
    polski - Polish
    I would translate "fuckable" as "jebalny/jebalna" (zdolna do bycia ruchaną), because "to fuck" in sexual context in Polish means "jebać, ruchać" and "fapable" as "fapalny/fapalna", because "to fap" - "fapać" is quite popular word and hasn't native version. There is no native word, which would describe "zdolna do wywołania u mnie chęci do masturbowania się".
     

    涼宮

    Senior Member
    Sbaeneg/Castellano (Venezuela)
    Thank you very much for the examples! I learnt new vocabulary, but they didn't actually showed a pattern to me :S. Yes, as you said, Polish has more exceptions than rules.
    jeść (eat) - jadalny (edible)
    czytać (read) - czytelny (legible)
    zmywać (wash) - zmywalny (washable)
    przenosić (carry, transport) - przenośny (portable)
    pić (drink) - pitny (drinkable)
    palić [się] (inflame, light up) - palny (inflammable)
    odwracać (reverse) - odwracalny (reversable)
    osiągać (achieve) - osiągalny (achievable)
    However, it does not work with any verb. "Fuckable" which would be "ruchalny"(?) sounds completely wrong, no one would use it but I suppose it could be understood

    Hope it helps and let's wait for more Poles to show up
    You hit the nail, sir! I found several entries for 'jebalny' on the internet.

    If I had to, I'd go for "jebalny", this should be easy enough to understand the intention. "Ruchalny" could possibly work as well.

    As for a phonological rule (-elny / -alny), I'd risk to say there's none and that the much less frequent -elny should be treated as a randomly occurring irregularity. Most of the adjectives ending with -elny bear no meaning of -able.
    Thanks for that too! I found the song and that word has more popularity than 'jebalny'.

    Fuckable - ruchałbym (or jebałbym). It literally means 'I would fuck her' but it works quite well. Another options: ruchable (ruchać + able); ruchalna. From my experience, these words are pretty common in some specific hip hop communities.

    Bonus - Quote from hip hop song Jeansy by Lilu:

    "Ale jest małe ups, kiedy widzę twój tyłek
    ta naga pupa pozdrawia przechodniów i rynek
    Oprócz tego, że jest fajna, mówi, że jesteś ruchalna"
    If I understood well what you said in Polish, then it doesn't mean what you said it means. 'fap' is just the sound that masturbation makes. http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=fap fap fap

    I would translate "fuckable" as "jebalny/jebalna" (zdolna do bycia ruchaną), because "to fuck" in sexual context in Polish means "jebać, ruchać" and "fapable" as "fapalny/fapalna", because "to fap" - "fapać" is quite popular word and hasn't native version. There is no native word, which would describe "zdolna do wywołania u mnie chęci do masturbowania się".
    And thank you again everybody! :D
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    Yes, Suzumiya. You are absolutely right. Polish has more exceptions than rules, or whoever said it in this thread. As for the words you found, I don't believe they are a part of regular vocabulary, even among reactive teenagers, or hip, or whatever you call them now. I don't have that much contact with Polish teenagers of 2012, but the ones I occasionally meet don't speak like that, even the ones confined to 3 years of juvenile correctional centers. Maybe some people speak like that in Poland, but it still does not prove anything. You don't have to follow the tasteless crowd.
     
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    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    The morpheme -able is originally Latin and compound. The -a- is the thematic vowel of the verbs of the 1st conjugation (cant-a-re > cant-a-bilis). There is also -e-bilis (rare) and -i-bilis (legibilis < legere, audibilis < audire) in Latin, and -ible in English.

    Czech seems to be quite regular in this respect (like Latin). We have the compound suffixes -atelný (corresponding to -abilis) and -itelný (corresponding to -ibilis) that are quite universal, essentially applicable to all (at least regular) verbs.

    Examples:
    slyšeti - slyšitelný (audible);
    viděti - viditelný (visible);
    vykonati - vykonatelný (executable);
    pochopiti - pochopitelný (comprehensible);
    mazati - mazatelný (erasable);
    ...

    There are some irregularities, of course: píti - pitný (drinkable), jísti - jedlý (edible);

    Fuckable is píchatelný (< píchati), šukatelný (< šukati), jebatelný (< jebati), šoustatelný (< šoustati) in slang Czech (all verbs are regular with the thematic vowel -a-).

    In Literary Czech it is souložitelný (< souložiti, = *coibilis ? from coire).
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    Not in Polish, Bibax. In Polish some of those meanings have to even by conveyed by whole phrases. You can say sometimes szłyszalny, but in other contexts you have to say, który można usłyszeć, przenoszony drogą dźwiękową, etc., akustyczny.
     

    Foxxionly

    New Member
    polski - Polish
    LilianaB,
    you meant "słyszalny"? You're quite right, but... "słyszalny" means the same what '(dźwięk) który można usłyszeć' and "akustyczny" isn't synonyme of "słyszalny". I would wonder about "przenoszony drogą dźwiękową" too. "Słyszalny" in most cases means just '(thing) that you can hear'.
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    This was not the point. It was just to illustrate that an adjective which can be expressed by a word formed in a regular way by just adding a particular suffix, could not always be created this way in Polish, and often you had to use the whole phrase to express the same, depending on the context. All three can mean something that could be heard or is meant to be heard in appropriate contexts, of course.
     

    dreamlike

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Let me just say that I have never heard anyone use neither "jebalna" nor "ruchalna" - the youth of today in Poland would most likely go with "ruchałbym", "jebałbym" or "dobra dupa" instead.
    I know of many foul-mouthed teenagers and these are the wordings they tend to use.
    The two adjectives mentioned earlier, although created in accordance with the rules of the Polish language, sound extremely odd (and crude, but that's a different story) to my ears, so they are best avoided (unless you want to make a laughing stock of yourself).
     
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    kknd

    Senior Member
    polski / Polish
    Let me just say that I have never heard anyone use neither "jebalna" nor "ruchalna" - the youth of today in Poland would most likely go with "ruchałbym", "jebałbym" or "dobra dupa" instead.
    I know of many foul-mouthed teenagers and these are the wordings they tend to use.
    The two adjectives mentioned earlier, although created in accordance with the rules of the Polish language, sound extremely odd (and crude, but that's a different story) to my ears, so they are best avoided (unless you want to make a laughing stock of yourself).
    as for me i wouldn't laugh at somebody speaking jebalna or ruchalna as for i would see through highly jocular (and horny) attitude of speaker; nevertheless people tend to use those "volitional" forms mentioned by dreamlike and not those "potential" 涼宮 was asking about… it seems to me that poles put more stress on their needs by saying something like poruchałbym etc. (subject/object not so important at the moment) and more on impression girl/woman made on them by uttering przeleciałbym etc.
     

    kknd

    Senior Member
    polski / Polish
    p.s. i heard also less vulgar but still quite improper socially zapiąłbym + [acc.]; from zapinać meaning roughly the same as przelecieć (i encountered also zapinać od tyłu few times).
     
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