fulfill a number of hours

Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hi, there

I'd like to know if I could say "fulfill + a certain number of hours of driving/teaching lessons "

For example

"You have to fulfill a X number of hours of driving lessons to get a driver's license"
"You should fulfill a X number's worth of teaching hours to become a teacher"

Would it sound odd?

Thank you
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In the USA I would expect "logged".

    I logged 16 hours of flying lessons before I got my pilots' license.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    In the USA I would expect "logged".

    I logged 16 hours of flying lessons before I got my pilots' license.
    So should I say "

    "You have to log a X number of hours of driving lessons to get a driver's license"
    "You should log a X number's worth of teaching hours to become a teacher"
    ?
    And shouldn't I use "number's worth"?

    Thank you
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I agree with log if the hours are recorded in a log book or something similar.

    Otherwise, I would use complete.
    I agree. But the examples sounded a bit like an if/then proposition. If you complete 16 hours of lessons you can get a drivers' license. As an if/then proposition then it would have to be recorded as proof of the lessons. So for the examples given I think "logged" is fine.

    But in general if the lessons are not recorded then "complete" is preferred.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    I agree with log if the hours are recorded in a log book or something similar.

    Otherwise, I would use complete.
    I agree. But the examples sounded a bit like an if/then proposition. If you complete 16 hours of lessons you can get a drivers' license. As an if/then proposition then it would have to be recorded as proof of the lessons. So for the examples given I think "logged" is fine.

    But in general if the lessons are not recorded then "complete" is preferred.
    But would you use "worth"? "You have to complete a X number's worth of hours of driving lessons"... "You have to complete a X number's worth of teaching lessons"
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Worth does not sound right to me unless there is some other credits attached. Otherwise I would not use it.

    I have a full 120 credits worth; enough to graduate from college. About 90 credits were for actual classes and the rest were based upon work experience.
     
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