full of vs. filled with

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Henrik Larsson, Jun 29, 2012.

  1. Henrik Larsson Banned

    Socuéllamos
    Spanish
    Hi, what's the difference (if any) between the following two sentences?:

    My bottle is full of beer
    My bottle is filled with beer

    In fact, I'm testing in general when to use "full of" and "filled with" which is somehow problematic for me.

    TIA
     
  2. perpend

    perpend Banned

    American English
    I think in your case it's the same, more or less.

    Here's a case where it's different:
    1) You are full of bologna.
    2) You are filled with bologna.

    Typically, only 1) is acceptable.
     
  3. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    I agree with Perpend that "My bottle is full of beer" is the normal way to make a remark about that bottle and its condition. I'd only use "My bottle is filled with beer" if I wanted to remark on the process of filling the bottle or something similar. Such remarks are pretty rare in my speech.
     
  4. perpend

    perpend Banned

    American English
    No, I was saying that the OP's examples are both equally okay for me (I would say both of those). I was trying to provide a different example with my post.
     
  5. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    My apologies, then. "You are filled with bologna" sounds very odd to me.
     
  6. perpend

    perpend Banned

    American English
    No, that was an aid to point out that "full of" and "filled with" are not always equal. Oy.
     
  7. entangledbank

    entangledbank Senior Member

    London
    English - South-East England
    'Full' tends to relate to how much is in it, where it is on the scale between full and empty: a bottle full of beer, a swimming pool full of water, a bucket full of sand are now at the maximum level, either because they've been filled up (the pool) or because none has been removed. 'Filled' places more emphasis on the action, so is typically used when the container does not normally contain the substance. A balloon filled with water is a balloon that has water in it (unusually for a balloon) - we're not contrasting it with a half-full water-filled balloon, but with an ordinary air-filled or deflated balloon. We'd probably prefer 'filled' for a beer bottle filled with tap water (perhaps to hold flowers): again, the interest is in what it has in it (what it's been filled with), not so much with the quantity used.
     
  8. Henrik Larsson Banned

    Socuéllamos
    Spanish
    Thanks for the answers.
     

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