full-powered motorcycle

< Previous | Next >

tati-tatoo

Senior Member
French - France
Hi!
Is there any motorcycle expert around who can help with that (see title)?
Is anyone familiar with this term? Is it the same than "heavy-duty motorcycle"?
 
Last edited:
  • Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    Even a motor-cycle specialist might need a bit more context.

    Even to a non-specialist, the words have meaning: the motor-cycle has an engine that works at full power (maximum capacity). But whether this has a special meaning for motor-bikes, I don't know.

    Does the text you are reading compare 'full-powered motorcycles' to other sorts of motorcycles? What does it say before and after this phrase?
     

    tati-tatoo

    Senior Member
    French - France
    I understand, but there is not really more context. It is just a few lines mentioning that if you want to take part in the challenge you must own a "full-powered motorcycle"
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    OK. Well I guess it must mean that your motorcycle must be of the required size (power) to enter the race. Is there a minimum engine power given as an entry requirement?
     

    tati-tatoo

    Senior Member
    French - France
    OK. Well I guess it must mean that your motorcycle must be of the required size (power) to enter the race. Is there a minimum engine power given as an entry requirement?
    Nope! I guess that I'll have to ask the customer at this point (I need to translate this into French).
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The below is an assumption based on what I know about the motorcycle laws in New York.


    In some jurisdictions motorcycles under a specific horse power rating, or with a limited top speed are treated differently in the eyes of the law. The low powered or speed-limited motorcycles are called "mopeds" in the USA. In some areas these can be ridden by people as young as 14 years old.

    A "full powered" motorcycle would require both a regular drivers license (and in New York) a special motorcycle license.

    Register a moped

    The DMV classifies a moped as a Class A, Class B or Class C limited use motorcycle according to its top speed. Only a certified model of limited use motorcycle can get a registration in New York State (only the manufacturer can certify a moped).
     

    tati-tatoo

    Senior Member
    French - France
    A "full powered" motorcycle would require both a regular drivers license (and in New York) a special motorcycle license.
    This is really helpful! I think that this is exactly what I was looking for (even if this material is not NY specific)
    Thank you so much!:thumbsup::tick:
     

    tati-tatoo

    Senior Member
    French - France
    So in substance, could it be synonym of a "heavy-duty motorcycle" or is a "heavy-duty motorcycle" just one typo of motorcycle meeting those requirements?
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I agree with Packard. :)

    I've owned and ridden number of different motorbikes, and here in the UK it's common to use the engine size (expressed in cc's) as a way of categorizing bikes, so a "full-powered motorcycle" would exclude, for example, a 50cc moped.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I would note that mopeds have a restricted use. They may not be used on highways or on our national highway system as they cannot maintain an adequate speed to be safe. They are handy for use in cities where parking is difficult.
     

    tati-tatoo

    Senior Member
    French - France
    I agree with Packard. :)

    I've owned and ridden number of different motorbikes, and here in the UK it's common to use the engine size (expressed in cc's) as a way of categorizing bikes, so a "full-powered motorcycle" would exclude, for example, a 50cc moped.
    So can you confirm that it could be the same than "heavy-duty motorcycle" or is that different? (I still have the idea that it is similar/the same)
     

    tati-tatoo

    Senior Member
    French - France
    I would note that mopeds have a restricted use. They may not be used on highways or on our national highway system as they cannot maintain an adequate speed to be safe. They are handy for use in cities where parking is difficult.
    Well, I think that this actually depends on the country... whatever, I am familiar with different categories such as moped, scooter, motorcycle (bigger and smaller models), but this is the first time I hear "full-powered motorbike"
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    As far as the Motor Vehicles Department (New York) is concerned, it is either a "moped" or a "motorcycle".

    There are also classes of motor scooter and some are as powerful a smaller motorcycles, but they are not allowed on the highway system either because the small wheel size makes them less stable at speed. (The larger wheel size of a motorcycle acts like a gyroscope and provides greater stability than a motor scooter can achieve because of its small wheel size. I believe 16" is the minimum wheel size for a motorcycle.)
     

    tati-tatoo

    Senior Member
    French - France
    As far as the Motor Vehicles Department (New York) is concerned, it is either a "moped" or a "motorcycle".
    Sorry, I am not following... So are you saying that "full-powered motorbike" can be any engine size and has nothing to do with the cc? So what does it mean?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Sorry, I am not following... So are you saying that "full-powered motorbike" can be any engine size and has nothing to do with the cc? So what does it mean?
    The Motor Vehicle Department does not use the terminology "full-powered motorbike". They simply use the category of "motorcycle" and the categories of Moped (A, B or C).

    They also have low powered motor scooters which are treated like mopeds, and high powered motor scooters for which you need a motorcycle license but cannot take on the highways.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    So in substance, could it be synonym of a "heavy-duty motorcycle" or is a "heavy-duty motorcycle" just one typo of motorcycle meeting those requirements?
    If Packard's assessment is correct (which seems very likely to me), a "full-powered motorcycle" is just an ordinary motorcycle, but it excludes things like mopeds and scooters that either aren't proper motorcycles or else have low-powered engines. It would be incorrect to describe a full-powered motorcycle as a "heavy-duty" motorcycle.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top