Full to bursting

Isapaola

Senior Member
Italian Italy
Hello, everybody
Sorry to bother you for something stupid, perhaps. My daughter is doing an exercise and she has found the phrase "I'm full to bursting" with no context. Just the words as they are. Shame on me, but I couldn't help translate it! Probably, or surely, it's my fault. Anyway I am sure any of you can solve this little motherly problem!
Thank you
 
  • AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    If you're full to bursting with an emotion like happiness, it means you're overwhelmed or overcome by that emotion.

    This is a slightly different feature of that expression than from being full to bursting by overeating.

    AngelEyes
     

    Isapaola

    Senior Member
    Italian Italy
    I see what you mean. Actually there is something similar in Italian, too. We say"sto per scoppiare" and it can relate to excess of food or of any sort of situations that may lead to unbearable feelings. Thank you to you too.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I've been trying to think of an AE word that would describe that bursting feeling you get when you eat a lot. The only one I can think of is stuffed.

    You might use it after you've enjoyed a Thanksgiving turkey dinner.

    You've be full to bursting and say, "I can't eat another thing. I'm stuffed."

    I can't come up with a word that would apply to both situations. When you're talking about food, it's a bit of an uncomfortable feeling.

    That's not necessarily true with emotions, though. Even if you're full to bursting with happiness, there's always room for more.

    And while your phrase can be used for the emotional meaning, the more common way for us to say it is, "I'm bursting with happiness."

    Cuchuflete's example use of the full expression for food really is the one most often used.

    AngelEyes
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I've been trying to think of an AE word that would describe that bursting feeling you get when you eat a lot. The only one I can think of is stuffed.

    You might use it after you've enjoyed a Thanksgiving turkey dinner.

    You've be full to bursting and say, "I can't eat another thing. I'm stuffed."

    I can't come up with a word that would apply to both situations. When you're talking about food, it's a bit of an uncomfortable feeling.

    That's not necessarily true with emotions, though. Even if you're full to bursting with happiness, there's always room for more.

    And while your phrase can be used for the emotional meaning, the more common way for us to say it is, "I'm bursting with happiness."

    Cuchuflete's example use of the full expression for food really is the one most often used.

    AngelEyes
    I suppose you could use sated for both emotions and physical sensations.
     

    Isapaola

    Senior Member
    Italian Italy
    I ca just say: how wonderful it is to visit this forum and meet so many brilliant people. Thank you for every word you wrote, for any minutes you devote to people who asks for youl help.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    My only problem with the word sated is that it carries a sexual pleasure-type feeling for me. Can we tie that to food? (Minus chocolate.)

    To be filled to bursting with happiness also feels pleasurable, but I can imagine being able to always find room for more.

    To be filled to bursting with food feels almost close to pain. (Granted, with some pleasure thrown into the mix.) But there comes a point where you just can't take any more.

    That's why I have a problem finding a word that fits both activities.

    Maybe this is just me.

    AngelEyes
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    To AngelEyes's problem with sated, I came across it in literature long before I was old enough to delve into the hidden splendors of, errr, artistically erotic scribblings. Yes, it probably is used in the porno trade (what isn't?), but it has a good pedigree elsewhere.
    Full to bursting, on the other hand (in the other hand?) might well be used in some turgid prose of the purple persuasion.

    As usual, both context and what one brings to the page will suggest one meaning atop another. [Puns? What puns?]


    PD- Isapaola, Welcome to the monolingual playground! We may not always be useful, but we have fun trying.
     
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